skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents

Abstract

The US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MHSA) recently formed a committee to identify norms and trends in remote control continuous miner crushing accidents. The final report found that these types of accidents commonly happen to experienced miners during routine mining activities, with the majority occurring while moving the miner from one face to another, place changing. Another common aspect of the accidents is that many of the victims are experienced miners who are newly employed at the mine where the accident occurred. Training all employees to stay outside the turning radius of an energized remote control continuous miner, establishing this as a safe operating procedure, and consistently enforcing this practice among miners will reduce these types of accidents. This article was excerpted from the 'Remote Control Continuous Mining Machine Crushing Accident Data Study' published in May 2006. The report may be found from the website: www.msha.gov. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885652
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: hill.juliette@dol.gov
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; USA; US MSHA; ACCIDENTS; CONTINUOUS MINERS; DATA ANALYSIS; MORTALITY; REMOTE CONTROL; COAL MINING; LONGWALL MINING; UNDERGROUND MINING; REGIONAL ANALYSIS; INJURIES; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; RECOMMENDATIONS

Citation Formats

NONE. MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
NONE. MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents. United States.
NONE. Thu . "MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885652,
title = {MSHA releases data on CM crushing accidents},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {The US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MHSA) recently formed a committee to identify norms and trends in remote control continuous miner crushing accidents. The final report found that these types of accidents commonly happen to experienced miners during routine mining activities, with the majority occurring while moving the miner from one face to another, place changing. Another common aspect of the accidents is that many of the victims are experienced miners who are newly employed at the mine where the accident occurred. Training all employees to stay outside the turning radius of an energized remote control continuous miner, establishing this as a safe operating procedure, and consistently enforcing this practice among miners will reduce these types of accidents. This article was excerpted from the 'Remote Control Continuous Mining Machine Crushing Accident Data Study' published in May 2006. The report may be found from the website: www.msha.gov. 4 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 2,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Using recently assembled data from the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) we shed new light on the regulatory approach to workplace safety. Because all underground coal mines are inspected quarterly, MSHA regulations will not be ineffective because of infrequent inspections. From over 200 different specifications of dynamic mine safety regressions we select the specification producing the largest MSHA impact. Even using results most favorable to the agency, MSHA is not currently cost effective. Almost 700,000 life years could be gained for typical miners if a quarter of MSHA's enforcement budget were reallocated to other programs (more heart disease screeningmore » or defibrillators at worksites).« less
  • In this paper releases of radionuclides and the production of aerosols during the molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) phase of degraded core accidents in light water reactors are termed ex-vessel releases. The VANESA and METOXA codes were respectively developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Industrial Degraded Core Rulemaking (IDCOR) program to quantify ex-vessel releases. Comparison of calculations by VANESA and METOXA (under identical initial and boundary conditions) show that except for niobium and strontium species, the predicted ex-vessel radionuclide release rates are within an order of magnitude of each other. In an actual application of these two codesmore » to the source term quantification of severe accidents, the initial and boundary conditions for the calculations could be significantly different, as demonstrated in an analysis of an anticipated transient without scram accident sequence in a boiling water reactor. For the same amount of debris, the MCCI thermal-hydraulic results provided for METOXA from a DECOMP calculation tend to drive more radioactive material from the debris pool than those provided for VANESA from a CORCON/MOD2 calculation. The MAAP code, however, predicts that less mass is involved in the MCCI.« less
  • In view of the public acceptance and the licensing procedure of projected fusion reactors, the release of tritium during normal operation as well as after accidents is a significant safety aspect. Tritium, being chemically identical to hydrogen and thus interacting directly with water and organic substances, differs considerably from the behaviour of other radionuclides in the environment. Therefore, the two consequence assessment codes UFOTRI and NORMTRI have been developed and applied to estimate the doses to the public from releases of tritium under accidental and routine conditions, respectively. In the frame of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and SEAFP (Safetymore » and Environmental Aspects of Fusion Power) the dose/release translation has been determined for typical and various worst case release scenarios. Under worst case accidental release conditions, the dose/release translation for the early dose to an individual at the fence may range from 0.5 to 1 mSv/g HTO. The result for the EDE at the fence is up to 3 mSv/g HTO. The collective accidental and dose/release translation is about 2.5 manSv/g HTO. However, due to processes inside the facility, only a small fraction of the mobilised activity may be released into the environment. 24 refs.« less