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Title: World coal demand grows and Australia meets the need

Abstract

The article quotes world thermal coal exports and imports figures for 2005 and forecast figures for 2006 and 2007, and world metallurgical coal consumption, production, imports and exports figures for 2004-2007, from the Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics (ABARE) 2006 Commodity Report. Australia exports a little more than 75% of its coal and it accounts for nearly 30% of the seaborne coal trade. Transportation constraints prevent some Australian coal producers form achieving full potential. The article also reports on 2006 production figures from and some new projects at the following Australian coal companies: BHP Billton, Xstrata Coal, Rio Tinto Coal Australia, Coal & Allied, Anglo Coal Australia, Peabody/Excel and Wesfarmers. 2 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885649
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; AUSTRALIA; COAL; GLOBAL ASPECTS; TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS; FORECASTING; PRODUCTION; COAL MINING; AUSTRALIAN ORGANIZATIONS; TRADE; IMPORTS; EXPORTS

Citation Formats

Fiscor, S. World coal demand grows and Australia meets the need. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Fiscor, S. World coal demand grows and Australia meets the need. United States.
Fiscor, S. Thu . "World coal demand grows and Australia meets the need". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885649,
title = {World coal demand grows and Australia meets the need},
author = {Fiscor, S.},
abstractNote = {The article quotes world thermal coal exports and imports figures for 2005 and forecast figures for 2006 and 2007, and world metallurgical coal consumption, production, imports and exports figures for 2004-2007, from the Australian Bureau of Agriculture and Resource Economics (ABARE) 2006 Commodity Report. Australia exports a little more than 75% of its coal and it accounts for nearly 30% of the seaborne coal trade. Transportation constraints prevent some Australian coal producers form achieving full potential. The article also reports on 2006 production figures from and some new projects at the following Australian coal companies: BHP Billton, Xstrata Coal, Rio Tinto Coal Australia, Coal & Allied, Anglo Coal Australia, Peabody/Excel and Wesfarmers. 2 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 2,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • A tabulation of world petroleum demand and supply analyzed by regions shows that the quadrupled oil prices in 1974 reduced consumption rates. The decline was 1 percent, but the increase per year had been increasing at a rate of 5 percent. The vigorous development of international production has resulted in a surplus world producing capacity of 10 to 12 million bpd. The climb in U.S. drilling has not reduced imports. Production growth leveled in 1975 due to political factors such as threats of nationalization, demands for much higher government participation in company profits, and imposition of even-higher taxes. High oilmore » prices reduced crude demand and cut oil sales by exporters that reduced exporting country income and caused exporters to consider a price increase. (MCW)« less
  • Australian coal exports continued to expand during 1979 with the total increasing by 13 percent for the year, reaching 43,161,336 tons. Japan was Australia's largest customer, accounting for 67 percent of the total coal exported. Australian exports are forecast to increase by up to 500 percent within the next 20 years to between 160,000,000 and 200,000,000 tons per year. This would necessitate an annual growth rate of around 8 percent. The vast increase in production required to meet the expected demand will necessitate the development of a more adequate infrastructure to facilitate exports, at a cost over the next 20more » years of $17,250,000,000. About two thirds of this is expected to be utilized in upgrading transportation facilities and ports. Each extra million tons of export capacity will require an expenditure of $92,000,000, approximately twice the cost of each extra million tons of domestic capacity. The cost of development on a per annum basis is expected to be some $862,500,000 or about 1 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP) and it is apparent that external sources of finance will be necessary. Coal will also play an important role in Australia's domestic energy requirements. Currently, coal provides 40 per cent, oil 45 percent, and gas 10 percent of the country's energy requirements. By 1990, coal will be the largest source of energy, providing about 38 percent while oil provides 35 percent and gas 14 percent.« less
  • A nationwide pipeline network to carry natural gas from Australia's North-West Shelf to eastern states is gaining in popularity, according to a recent report. Engineering and economic feasibility studies support a transcontinental system that would meet energy demands until the end of the century. An estimated 6400 km of pipeline is needed. A 20-year agreement for liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports has not yet been settled because of government concern over projected acceptable shortfalls in the local market. Justification for pipeline routes is reviewed, with competition date for the first section set at 1982 and connection with the North-West Shelfmore » by 1991. Production goals will be geared to having supplies available for the mid-1980's, however, as a strategic reserve in the event of disaster or accident. Widespread public discussion will be encouraged by the pipeline company to allow full public input to government policy decisions. A uniform pricing schedule to each of the capitols will be set even though construction and operating costs will vary. Reserve estimates of proven fields indicate that extensive exploration of probably and possible reserves is needed to meet demand growth beyond the year 2000. The discovery of additional reserves will relieve the anticipated shortfall from LNG export. (DCK)« less
  • The Cooper basin has the most significant onshore petroleum reserves so far discovered in Australia. The Cooper basin liquids project, worth $1.45 billion (Australian), is now onstream. It is designed to recover LPG, condensate, and crude oil. This massive project was implemented within the development plan timetable and within budget. Early shipment of crude-condensate gained an early cash flow. The project was carried out by a consortium of 11 companies, known collectively as the Cooper Basin Producers, with Santos Ltd. as operator. Oil and gas are gathered from fields around Moomba, in the central Australian desert. At Moomba, the oilmore » is stabilized and the gas sweetened, dehydrated, and run through an expander plant. Sales gas is transported by separate pipeline to major domestic markets in Sydney and Adelaide. Stabilized crude and natural gas liquids (NGL) are mixed and transported by a common line to Port Bonython on the southern Australian coast. At Port Bonython, the mixture is fractionated into LPG, propane, butane, condensate, and crude.« less