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Title: ''Dirty, old'' coal plants: silk purse or sow's ear?

Abstract

The current debate over what to do with ''dirty, old'' power plants is severely hampered by a narrow and rigid decision frame. Adopting a broader, more flexible decision frame, and using improved analytical tools suited for that frame, can make a real and important difference in the strategy for such plants, creating both economic and environmental benefits. (author)

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20880632
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; DECISION MAKING; PLANNING; OPERATION; EXHAUST GASES; SCRUBBERS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Borison, Adam, and Hamm, Greg. ''Dirty, old'' coal plants: silk purse or sow's ear?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2007.02.004.
Borison, Adam, & Hamm, Greg. ''Dirty, old'' coal plants: silk purse or sow's ear?. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2007.02.004.
Borison, Adam, and Hamm, Greg. Sun . "''Dirty, old'' coal plants: silk purse or sow's ear?". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2007.02.004.
@article{osti_20880632,
title = {''Dirty, old'' coal plants: silk purse or sow's ear?},
author = {Borison, Adam and Hamm, Greg},
abstractNote = {The current debate over what to do with ''dirty, old'' power plants is severely hampered by a narrow and rigid decision frame. Adopting a broader, more flexible decision frame, and using improved analytical tools suited for that frame, can make a real and important difference in the strategy for such plants, creating both economic and environmental benefits. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.TEJ.2007.02.004},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 3,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The ability of fluidized-bed combustion to provide the coal industry with a clean-burning alternative is surveyed. The process can burn high-sulfur coal cleanly without the aid of a scrubber system. Fluidized-bed combustion technology is being promoted by DOE for use in the industrial sector. The current status of fluidized-bed combustion technology is outlined. (2 diagrams, 4 photos, 1 table)
  • Water-insoluble regenerated silk materials are normally produced by increasing the {beta}-sheet content (silk II). In the present study water-insoluble silk films were prepared by controlling the very slow drying of Bombyx mori silk solutions, resulting in the formation of stable films with a predominant silk I instead of silk II structure. Wide angle X-ray scattering indicated that the silk films stabilized by slow drying were mainly composed of silk I rather than silk II, while water- and methanol-annealed silk films had a higher silk II content. The silk films prepared by slow drying had a globule-like structure at the coremore » surrounded by nano-filaments. The core region was composed of silk I and silk II, surrounded by hydrophilic nano-filaments containing random turns and {alpha}-helix secondary structures. The insoluble silk films prepared by slow drying had unique thermal, mechanical and degradative properties. Differential scanning calorimetry results revealed that silk I crystals had stable thermal properties up to 250 C, without crystallization above the T{sub g}, but degraded at lower temperatures than silk II structure. Compared with water- and methanol-annealed films the films prepared by slow drying had better mechanical ductility and were more rapidly enzymatically degraded, reflecting the differences in secondary structure achieved via differences in post processing of the cast silk films. Importantly, the silk I structure, a key intermediate secondary structure for the formation of mechanically robust natural silk fibers, was successfully generated by the present approach of very slow drying, mimicking the natural process. The results also point to a new mode of generating new types of silk biomaterials with enhanced mechanical properties and increased degradation rates, while maintaining water insolubility, along with a low {beta}-sheet content.« less