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Title: Scaling laws for dielectric window breakdown in vacuum and collisional regimes

Abstract

The scaling laws for the initiation time of radio frequency (rf) window breakdown are constructed for three gases: Ar, Xe, and Ne. They apply to the vacuum, to the multipactor-triggered regime, and to the collisional rf plasma regime, and they are corroborated by computer simulations of these three gases over a wide range of pressures. This work elucidates the key factors that are needed for the prediction of rf window breakdown in complex gases, such as air, at various pressures.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20880191
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 26; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2425025; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; AIR; ARGON; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; HIGH-FREQUENCY DISCHARGES; NEON; PLASMA; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; SCALING LAWS; XENON

Citation Formats

Lau, Y. Y., Verboncoeur, J. P., and Kim, H. C. Scaling laws for dielectric window breakdown in vacuum and collisional regimes. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2425025.
Lau, Y. Y., Verboncoeur, J. P., & Kim, H. C. Scaling laws for dielectric window breakdown in vacuum and collisional regimes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2425025.
Lau, Y. Y., Verboncoeur, J. P., and Kim, H. C. Mon . "Scaling laws for dielectric window breakdown in vacuum and collisional regimes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2425025.
@article{osti_20880191,
title = {Scaling laws for dielectric window breakdown in vacuum and collisional regimes},
author = {Lau, Y. Y. and Verboncoeur, J. P. and Kim, H. C.},
abstractNote = {The scaling laws for the initiation time of radio frequency (rf) window breakdown are constructed for three gases: Ar, Xe, and Ne. They apply to the vacuum, to the multipactor-triggered regime, and to the collisional rf plasma regime, and they are corroborated by computer simulations of these three gases over a wide range of pressures. This work elucidates the key factors that are needed for the prediction of rf window breakdown in complex gases, such as air, at various pressures.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2425025},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 26,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 25 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Dec 25 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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