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Title: A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM

Abstract

A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. National Building Research Institute, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)
  2. National Building Research Institute, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel). E-mail: bentur@tx.technion.ac.il
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20871580
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cement and Concrete Research; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.09.014; PII: S0008-8846(06)00234-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CAPSULES; CEMENTS; DRYING; ELECTRONS; GYPSUM; HYDRATION; MEMBRANES; MICROSCOPES; PERFORMANCE; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Katz, A., Bentur, A., and Kovler, K. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.09.014.
Katz, A., Bentur, A., & Kovler, K. A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM. United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.09.014.
Katz, A., Bentur, A., and Kovler, K. Mon . "A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM". United States. doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.09.014.
@article{osti_20871580,
title = {A novel system for in-situ observations of early hydration reactions in wet conditions in conventional SEM},
author = {Katz, A. and Bentur, A. and Kovler, K.},
abstractNote = {A novel system enabling wet microscopy in conventional SEM is described and its performance for in-situ study of hydration reactions is demonstrated. The technology is based on a sealed specimen capsule, which is protected from the microscope vacuum by an electron-transparent partition membrane. Thus, the wet sample can be placed and observed in a 'conventional' SEM without the need for drying or employing environmental SEM. Early hydration reactions of gypsum and cement systems were followed during the first 24 h.},
doi = {10.1016/j.cemconres.2006.09.014},
journal = {Cement and Concrete Research},
number = 1,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.
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