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Title: Second-order gravitational self-force

Abstract

We derive an expression for the second-order gravitational self-force that acts on a self-gravitating compact object moving in a curved background spacetime. First we develop a new method of derivation and apply it to the derivation of the first-order gravitational self-force. Here we find that our result conforms with the previously derived expression. Next we generalize our method and derive a new expression for the second-order gravitational self-force. This study also has a practical motivation: The data analysis for the planned gravitational wave detector LISA requires construction of waveform templates for the expected gravitational waves. Calculation of the two leading orders of the gravitational self-force will enable one to construct highly accurate waveform templates, which are needed for the data analysis of gravitational waves that are emitted from extreme mass-ratio binaries.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20871410
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. D, Particles Fields; Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.74.084018; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; COSMOLOGY; DATA ANALYSIS; EMISSION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MASS; SPACE-TIME; WAVE FORMS

Citation Formats

Rosenthal, Eran. Second-order gravitational self-force. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.084018.
Rosenthal, Eran. Second-order gravitational self-force. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.084018.
Rosenthal, Eran. 2006. "Second-order gravitational self-force". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.084018.
@article{osti_20871410,
title = {Second-order gravitational self-force},
author = {Rosenthal, Eran},
abstractNote = {We derive an expression for the second-order gravitational self-force that acts on a self-gravitating compact object moving in a curved background spacetime. First we develop a new method of derivation and apply it to the derivation of the first-order gravitational self-force. Here we find that our result conforms with the previously derived expression. Next we generalize our method and derive a new expression for the second-order gravitational self-force. This study also has a practical motivation: The data analysis for the planned gravitational wave detector LISA requires construction of waveform templates for the expected gravitational waves. Calculation of the two leading orders of the gravitational self-force will enable one to construct highly accurate waveform templates, which are needed for the data analysis of gravitational waves that are emitted from extreme mass-ratio binaries.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.084018},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
number = 8,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month =
}
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