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Title: Cold dark matter as compact composite objects

Abstract

Dark matter (DM) being the vital ingredient in the cosmos, still remains a mystery. The standard assumption is that the collisionless cold dark matter (CCDM) particles are represented by some weakly interacting fundamental fields which cannot be associated with any standard quarks or leptons. However, recent analyses of structure on galactic and subgalactic scales have suggested discrepancies and stimulated numerous alternative proposals including, e.g. self-interacting dark matter, self-annihilating dark matter, decaying dark matter, to name just a few. We propose the alternative to the standard assumption about the nature of DM particles (which are typically assumed to be weakly interacting fundamental pointlike particles, yet to be discovered). Our proposal is based on the idea that DM particles are strongly interacting composite macroscopically large objects which made of well-known light quarks (or even antiquarks). The required weakness of the DM particle interactions is guaranteed by a small geometrical factor {epsilon}{approx}(area/volume){approx}B{sup -1/3}<<1 of the composite objects with a large baryon charge B>>1, rather than by a weak coupling constant of a new field. We argue that the interaction between hadronic matter and composite dark objects does not spoil the desired properties of the latter as cold matter. We also argue that suchmore » a scenario does not contradict to the current observational data. Rather, it has natural explanations of many observed data, such as {omega}{sub DM}/{omega}{sub B}{approx}1 or 511 KeV line from the bulge of our galaxy. We also suggest that composite dark matter may modify the dynamics of structure formation in the central overdense regions of galaxies. We also present a number of other cosmological/astrophysical observations which indirectly support the novel concept of DM nature.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20870961
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. D, Particles Fields
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.74.043515; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0556-2821
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BARYONS; COSMOLOGY; COUPLING CONSTANTS; D QUARKS; GALAXIES; KEV RANGE; LEPTONS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PARTICLE INTERACTIONS; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; U QUARKS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Zhitnitsky, Ariel. Cold dark matter as compact composite objects. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.043515.
Zhitnitsky, Ariel. Cold dark matter as compact composite objects. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.043515.
Zhitnitsky, Ariel. Tue . "Cold dark matter as compact composite objects". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.043515.
@article{osti_20870961,
title = {Cold dark matter as compact composite objects},
author = {Zhitnitsky, Ariel},
abstractNote = {Dark matter (DM) being the vital ingredient in the cosmos, still remains a mystery. The standard assumption is that the collisionless cold dark matter (CCDM) particles are represented by some weakly interacting fundamental fields which cannot be associated with any standard quarks or leptons. However, recent analyses of structure on galactic and subgalactic scales have suggested discrepancies and stimulated numerous alternative proposals including, e.g. self-interacting dark matter, self-annihilating dark matter, decaying dark matter, to name just a few. We propose the alternative to the standard assumption about the nature of DM particles (which are typically assumed to be weakly interacting fundamental pointlike particles, yet to be discovered). Our proposal is based on the idea that DM particles are strongly interacting composite macroscopically large objects which made of well-known light quarks (or even antiquarks). The required weakness of the DM particle interactions is guaranteed by a small geometrical factor {epsilon}{approx}(area/volume){approx}B{sup -1/3}<<1 of the composite objects with a large baryon charge B>>1, rather than by a weak coupling constant of a new field. We argue that the interaction between hadronic matter and composite dark objects does not spoil the desired properties of the latter as cold matter. We also argue that such a scenario does not contradict to the current observational data. Rather, it has natural explanations of many observed data, such as {omega}{sub DM}/{omega}{sub B}{approx}1 or 511 KeV line from the bulge of our galaxy. We also suggest that composite dark matter may modify the dynamics of structure formation in the central overdense regions of galaxies. We also present a number of other cosmological/astrophysical observations which indirectly support the novel concept of DM nature.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVD.74.043515},
journal = {Physical Review. D, Particles Fields},
issn = {0556-2821},
number = 4,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {8}
}