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Title: Diarylethene microcrystals make directional jumps upon ultraviolet irradiation

Abstract

Microcrystals of a diarylethene {l_brace}1,2-bis[5{sup '}-methyl-2{sup '}-(2{sup ''}-pyridyl)thiazolyl]perfluorocyclo-pentene {r_brace} undergo jumps upon photoirradiation. These photochromic crystals present molecular structural changes upon irradiation with ultraviolet light because of reversible photocyclization reactions. When the energy absorbed by crystals reaches about 10 {mu}J, the uniaxial stress induced in the crystal lattice relaxes through directional jumps. If one prevents crystals from jumping, then parallel, equidistant cracks appear on crystal surfaces. These photomechanical effects could result from a Grinfeld surface instability.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique CNRS UMR5588, Universite Grenoble I (France)
  2. (France)
  3. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20868208
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 126; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2429061; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ALKENES; AROMATICS; CRACKS; CRYSTAL LATTICES; CRYSTALS; INSTABILITY; IRRADIATION; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; STRESSES; SURFACES; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

Citation Formats

Colombier, I., Spagnoli, S., Corval, A., Baldeck, P. L., Giraud, M., Leaustic, A., Yu, P., Irie, M., Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite Paris-Sud, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kyushu University. Diarylethene microcrystals make directional jumps upon ultraviolet irradiation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2429061.
Colombier, I., Spagnoli, S., Corval, A., Baldeck, P. L., Giraud, M., Leaustic, A., Yu, P., Irie, M., Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite Paris-Sud, & Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kyushu University. Diarylethene microcrystals make directional jumps upon ultraviolet irradiation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2429061.
Colombier, I., Spagnoli, S., Corval, A., Baldeck, P. L., Giraud, M., Leaustic, A., Yu, P., Irie, M., Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite Paris-Sud, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kyushu University. Sun . "Diarylethene microcrystals make directional jumps upon ultraviolet irradiation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2429061.
@article{osti_20868208,
title = {Diarylethene microcrystals make directional jumps upon ultraviolet irradiation},
author = {Colombier, I. and Spagnoli, S. and Corval, A. and Baldeck, P. L. and Giraud, M. and Leaustic, A. and Yu, P. and Irie, M. and Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique, Universite Paris-Sud and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kyushu University},
abstractNote = {Microcrystals of a diarylethene {l_brace}1,2-bis[5{sup '}-methyl-2{sup '}-(2{sup ''}-pyridyl)thiazolyl]perfluorocyclo-pentene {r_brace} undergo jumps upon photoirradiation. These photochromic crystals present molecular structural changes upon irradiation with ultraviolet light because of reversible photocyclization reactions. When the energy absorbed by crystals reaches about 10 {mu}J, the uniaxial stress induced in the crystal lattice relaxes through directional jumps. If one prevents crystals from jumping, then parallel, equidistant cracks appear on crystal surfaces. These photomechanical effects could result from a Grinfeld surface instability.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2429061},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 126,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 07 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sun Jan 07 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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