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Title: Modeling market power in electricity markets: Is the devil only in the details?

Abstract

Basic approximations of the transmission system are ubiquitous in the literature on modeling competition in electricity markets. Because the main concern of market power is with active power, reactive power and voltage-related issues are commonly neglected, even though they are inherent features of an electrical power system. However, the usefulness of stylized formulations that do not comprise these system elements may be severely limited. (author)

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20864964
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; MARKET; SIMULATION; ELECTRIC POWER; POWER SYSTEMS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ACCURACY; COMPETITION

Citation Formats

Bautista, Guillermo, Anjos, Miguel F., and Vannelli, Anthony. Modeling market power in electricity markets: Is the devil only in the details?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2006.12.001.
Bautista, Guillermo, Anjos, Miguel F., & Vannelli, Anthony. Modeling market power in electricity markets: Is the devil only in the details?. United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2006.12.001.
Bautista, Guillermo, Anjos, Miguel F., and Vannelli, Anthony. Mon . "Modeling market power in electricity markets: Is the devil only in the details?". United States. doi:10.1016/J.TEJ.2006.12.001.
@article{osti_20864964,
title = {Modeling market power in electricity markets: Is the devil only in the details?},
author = {Bautista, Guillermo and Anjos, Miguel F. and Vannelli, Anthony},
abstractNote = {Basic approximations of the transmission system are ubiquitous in the literature on modeling competition in electricity markets. Because the main concern of market power is with active power, reactive power and voltage-related issues are commonly neglected, even though they are inherent features of an electrical power system. However, the usefulness of stylized formulations that do not comprise these system elements may be severely limited. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.TEJ.2006.12.001},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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