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Title: Survey of noise in coal preparation plants

Abstract

In response to the continuing problem of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) among mine workers, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted numerous noise surveys in coal preparation plants. The research, consisting of worker dose monitoring, task observations, and equipment noise profiling, was completed in eight separate preparation plants. Worker dose monitoring was conducted for three shifts in most cases. Workers experiencing higher than allowable doses were task-observed for one full shift to correlate dose to noise source(s). Finally, noise levels on all floors, and in lunch rooms and control rooms, were characterized. Results indicate that only workers who routinely spend a significant portion of their shift in the plants (away from the control rooms) are susceptible to overexposure from noise. Certain pieces of equipment (screens, centrifuges, sieve bends) are the loudest primary noise sources responsible for the worker noise exposures.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862382
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America; Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL PREPARATION PLANTS; NOISE POLLUTION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PERSONNEL; MONITORING; HEALTH HAZARDS; NOISE DOSEMETERS; NOISE

Citation Formats

Vipperman, J.S., Bauer, E.R., and Babich, D.R. Survey of noise in coal preparation plants. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1121/1.2372587.
Vipperman, J.S., Bauer, E.R., & Babich, D.R. Survey of noise in coal preparation plants. United States. doi:10.1121/1.2372587.
Vipperman, J.S., Bauer, E.R., and Babich, D.R. Mon . "Survey of noise in coal preparation plants". United States. doi:10.1121/1.2372587.
@article{osti_20862382,
title = {Survey of noise in coal preparation plants},
author = {Vipperman, J.S. and Bauer, E.R. and Babich, D.R.},
abstractNote = {In response to the continuing problem of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) among mine workers, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted numerous noise surveys in coal preparation plants. The research, consisting of worker dose monitoring, task observations, and equipment noise profiling, was completed in eight separate preparation plants. Worker dose monitoring was conducted for three shifts in most cases. Workers experiencing higher than allowable doses were task-observed for one full shift to correlate dose to noise source(s). Finally, noise levels on all floors, and in lunch rooms and control rooms, were characterized. Results indicate that only workers who routinely spend a significant portion of their shift in the plants (away from the control rooms) are susceptible to overexposure from noise. Certain pieces of equipment (screens, centrifuges, sieve bends) are the loudest primary noise sources responsible for the worker noise exposures.},
doi = {10.1121/1.2372587},
journal = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
number = 1,
volume = 121,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Slurry pumps are the heart of every coal preparation system. Even though the slurry pump is the heart of the system and may represent only 1% or less of the total plant cost, pumps are often the victims of cost cutting. Since slurry pumps generally have a quick delivery in comparison to other specialty equipment required for a new plant, they are often ordered last when the plant is already in a cost overrun condition. This results in the selection of inexpensive equipment that sometimes is undersized. The proper selection of a pump must be made on the basis ofmore » available knowledge of the products on the market. There are some 400 pump manufacturers from which to choose: there are less than one dozen heavy-duty quality slurry pumps. Selection should be made according to the reliability, parts availability and cost, efficiency, service life of wear parts, and the technical support the manufacturer can provide. Pump cost is, of course, important but the initial cost of the product has very little to do with the overall cost. The savings in parts, maintenance, and operating cost of a higher quality pump will most often offset the initial savings of a lower cost product. Pump selection guidelines are given.« less