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Title: Sorption/desorption reversibility of phenanthrene in soils and carbonaceous materials

Abstract

Sorption/desorption of phenanthrene in two soil samples and carbonaceous materials was found to yield co-incident equilibrium isotherms and no significant hysteresis was observed. Additionally, release of native phenanthrene was investigated. Equilibrium sorption and desorption isotherms were determined using pulverized samples of Pahokee peat, lignite, and high-volatile bituminous coal, a mineral soil, and an anthropogenic soil. Instead of the conventional decant-and-refill batch method, sorption/desorption was driven by temperature changes using consistent samples. Sorption started at 77{sup o}C and was increased by reducing the temperature stepwise to 46, 20, and finally 4{sup o}C. For desorption the temperature was increased stepwise again until 77{sup o}C was reached. Besides the co-incident sorption and desorption isotherms at each temperature step, the solubility-normalized sorption/desorption isotherms of all different temperatures collapse to unique overall isotherms. Leaching of native phenanthrene occurred at much lower concentrations but was well predicted by extrapolation of the spiked sorption isotherms indicating that the release of native phenanthrene involves the same sorption/desorption mechanisms as those for newly added phenanthrene. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany). Center for Applied Geoscience
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862367
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: grathwohl@uni-tuebingen.de
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; SORPTION; DESORPTION; PHENANTHRENE; SOILS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS; PEAT; LIGNITE; BITUMINOUS COAL; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; LEACHING; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; MATERIALS RECOVERY; DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Guohui Wang, Sybille Kleineidam, and Peter Grathwohl. Sorption/desorption reversibility of phenanthrene in soils and carbonaceous materials. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/es060805s.
Guohui Wang, Sybille Kleineidam, & Peter Grathwohl. Sorption/desorption reversibility of phenanthrene in soils and carbonaceous materials. United States. doi:10.1021/es060805s.
Guohui Wang, Sybille Kleineidam, and Peter Grathwohl. Thu . "Sorption/desorption reversibility of phenanthrene in soils and carbonaceous materials". United States. doi:10.1021/es060805s.
@article{osti_20862367,
title = {Sorption/desorption reversibility of phenanthrene in soils and carbonaceous materials},
author = {Guohui Wang and Sybille Kleineidam and Peter Grathwohl},
abstractNote = {Sorption/desorption of phenanthrene in two soil samples and carbonaceous materials was found to yield co-incident equilibrium isotherms and no significant hysteresis was observed. Additionally, release of native phenanthrene was investigated. Equilibrium sorption and desorption isotherms were determined using pulverized samples of Pahokee peat, lignite, and high-volatile bituminous coal, a mineral soil, and an anthropogenic soil. Instead of the conventional decant-and-refill batch method, sorption/desorption was driven by temperature changes using consistent samples. Sorption started at 77{sup o}C and was increased by reducing the temperature stepwise to 46, 20, and finally 4{sup o}C. For desorption the temperature was increased stepwise again until 77{sup o}C was reached. Besides the co-incident sorption and desorption isotherms at each temperature step, the solubility-normalized sorption/desorption isotherms of all different temperatures collapse to unique overall isotherms. Leaching of native phenanthrene occurred at much lower concentrations but was well predicted by extrapolation of the spiked sorption isotherms indicating that the release of native phenanthrene involves the same sorption/desorption mechanisms as those for newly added phenanthrene. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/es060805s},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 4,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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