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Title: Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe

Abstract

This paper describes a new approach in life-cycle impact assessment to derive characterization factors for acidification in European forests. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification were calculated, whereas before only steady-state factors were available. The characterization factors indicate the change in the potential occurrence of plant species due to a change in emission, and they consist of a fate and an effect factor. The fate factor combines the results of an atmospheric deposition model and a dynamic soil acidification model. The change in base saturation in soil due to an atmospheric emission change was derived for 20, 50, 100, and 500 year time horizons. The effect factor was based on a dose-response curve of the potential occurrence of plant species, derived from multiple regression equations per plant species. The results showed that characterization factors for acidification increase up to a factor of 13 from a 20 years to a 500 years time horizon. Characterization factors for ammonia are 4.0-4.3 times greater than those for nitrogen oxides (NOx), and characterization factors for sulfur dioxide are 1.4-2.0 times greater than those for NOx. Aggregation of damage due to acidification with other impact categories on the European scale becomes feasible with themore » applied approach. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Department of Environmental Sciences, Institute for Water and Wetland Research
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862366
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 41; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: r.vanzelm@science.ru.nl
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EUROPE; FORESTS; ACIDIFICATION; PLANTS; SPECIES DIVERSITY; NITROGEN OXIDES; LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT; SOILS; AIR POLLUTION; AMMONIA; SULFUR DIOXIDE; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; CALCULATION METHODS; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Rosalie van Zelm, Mark A.J. Huijbregts, Hans A. van Jaarsveld, Gert Jan Reinds, Dick de Zwart, Jaap Struijs, and Dik van de Meent. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/es061433q.
Rosalie van Zelm, Mark A.J. Huijbregts, Hans A. van Jaarsveld, Gert Jan Reinds, Dick de Zwart, Jaap Struijs, & Dik van de Meent. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe. United States. doi:10.1021/es061433q.
Rosalie van Zelm, Mark A.J. Huijbregts, Hans A. van Jaarsveld, Gert Jan Reinds, Dick de Zwart, Jaap Struijs, and Dik van de Meent. Thu . "Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe". United States. doi:10.1021/es061433q.
@article{osti_20862366,
title = {Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification in life-cycle assessment based on forest plant species occurrence in Europe},
author = {Rosalie van Zelm and Mark A.J. Huijbregts and Hans A. van Jaarsveld and Gert Jan Reinds and Dick de Zwart and Jaap Struijs and Dik van de Meent},
abstractNote = {This paper describes a new approach in life-cycle impact assessment to derive characterization factors for acidification in European forests. Time horizon dependent characterization factors for acidification were calculated, whereas before only steady-state factors were available. The characterization factors indicate the change in the potential occurrence of plant species due to a change in emission, and they consist of a fate and an effect factor. The fate factor combines the results of an atmospheric deposition model and a dynamic soil acidification model. The change in base saturation in soil due to an atmospheric emission change was derived for 20, 50, 100, and 500 year time horizons. The effect factor was based on a dose-response curve of the potential occurrence of plant species, derived from multiple regression equations per plant species. The results showed that characterization factors for acidification increase up to a factor of 13 from a 20 years to a 500 years time horizon. Characterization factors for ammonia are 4.0-4.3 times greater than those for nitrogen oxides (NOx), and characterization factors for sulfur dioxide are 1.4-2.0 times greater than those for NOx. Aggregation of damage due to acidification with other impact categories on the European scale becomes feasible with the applied approach. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1021/es061433q},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 3,
volume = 41,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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