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Title: The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message

Abstract

The lack of good communication is a very real problem in mine emergencies. To counter communication breakdowns, researchers at the NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory developed the Emergency Communication Triangle. It is a training intervention designed to help those giving a warning to provide the right sort of information and those receiving a warning to ask the right questions. The Triangle has six ordered components with the first three considered most important. The Emergency Communication is packaged as a short safety talk to be given by supervisors at the start of a shift. It was first tested in 1998 with a group of 236 workers at an underground mine in Colorado, and proved effective. It was followed up in 2003 and again in 2004. Now, more than half the miners would report who was affected by an event, 60% would report in its severity, and 70% would say what had been done so far. 3 figs.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. NIOSH-PRL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862362
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; USA; EMERGENCY PLANS; COAL MINING; COMMUNICATIONS; UNDERGROUND MINING; EVACUATION; US NIOSH; RECOMMENDATIONS; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; COAL MINERS; TRAINING; FIRES

Citation Formats

Vaught, C., Brnich, M.J. Jr., and Mallett, L.. The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Vaught, C., Brnich, M.J. Jr., & Mallett, L.. The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message. United States.
Vaught, C., Brnich, M.J. Jr., and Mallett, L.. Mon . "The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20862362,
title = {The communication triangle: elements of an effective warning message},
author = {Vaught, C. and Brnich, M.J. Jr. and Mallett, L.},
abstractNote = {The lack of good communication is a very real problem in mine emergencies. To counter communication breakdowns, researchers at the NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory developed the Emergency Communication Triangle. It is a training intervention designed to help those giving a warning to provide the right sort of information and those receiving a warning to ask the right questions. The Triangle has six ordered components with the first three considered most important. The Emergency Communication is packaged as a short safety talk to be given by supervisors at the start of a shift. It was first tested in 1998 with a group of 236 workers at an underground mine in Colorado, and proved effective. It was followed up in 2003 and again in 2004. Now, more than half the miners would report who was affected by an event, 60% would report in its severity, and 70% would say what had been done so far. 3 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 1,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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