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Title: Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners

Abstract

As part of a five research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Peabody Energy studied three experimental cast blasts conducted at the North Antelope Rochelle mine site on July 24,28 and 31 2005. The initial purpose of this research project was to determine the influence that blast initiation sequence have on: NOx production; Face Displacement; Highwall damage; Explosive performance; Vibration emissions; Displacement; Surface swell; and Cast benefit. Two new discoveries on velocity of detonation (VoD) and pressure of detonation (PoD) were made as a result of this research project. Furthermore, a relationship between surface swell velocity and face velocity was also noted. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862361
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; EXPLOSIVE FRACTURING; AMMONIUM NITRATES; BOREHOLES; USA; LINERS; PARTICLE SIZE; VELOCITY; EXPLOSIONS; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; PRESSURE MEASUREMENT; POWDERS; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES; EFFICIENCY; OPTIMIZATION; SWELLING; NITROGEN OXIDES; PRESSURE GAGES; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; FRAGMENTATION; OVERBURDEN

Citation Formats

Madsen, A. Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Madsen, A. Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners. United States.
Madsen, A. Mon . "Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20862361,
title = {Optimizing cast blasting efficiency using ANFO with liners},
author = {Madsen, A.},
abstractNote = {As part of a five research project funded by the National Science Foundation, Peabody Energy studied three experimental cast blasts conducted at the North Antelope Rochelle mine site on July 24,28 and 31 2005. The initial purpose of this research project was to determine the influence that blast initiation sequence have on: NOx production; Face Displacement; Highwall damage; Explosive performance; Vibration emissions; Displacement; Surface swell; and Cast benefit. Two new discoveries on velocity of detonation (VoD) and pressure of detonation (PoD) were made as a result of this research project. Furthermore, a relationship between surface swell velocity and face velocity was also noted. 7 figs., 3 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 1,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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