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Title: Preparing to capture carbon

Abstract

Carbon sequestration from large sources of fossil fuel combustion, particularly coal, is an essential component of any serious plan to avoid catastrophic impacts of human-induced climate change. Scientific and economic challenges still exist, but none are serious enough to suggest that carbon capture and storage will not work at the scale required to offset trillions of tons of carbon dioxide emissions over the next century. The challenge is whether the technology will be ready when society decides that it is time to get going.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862321
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science (Washington, D.C.); Journal Volume: 315; Journal Issue: 5813
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CARBON DIOXIDE; CAPTURE; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COAL; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Schrag, D.P. Preparing to capture carbon. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1126/science.1137632.
Schrag, D.P. Preparing to capture carbon. United States. doi:10.1126/science.1137632.
Schrag, D.P. Fri . "Preparing to capture carbon". United States. doi:10.1126/science.1137632.
@article{osti_20862321,
title = {Preparing to capture carbon},
author = {Schrag, D.P.},
abstractNote = {Carbon sequestration from large sources of fossil fuel combustion, particularly coal, is an essential component of any serious plan to avoid catastrophic impacts of human-induced climate change. Scientific and economic challenges still exist, but none are serious enough to suggest that carbon capture and storage will not work at the scale required to offset trillions of tons of carbon dioxide emissions over the next century. The challenge is whether the technology will be ready when society decides that it is time to get going.},
doi = {10.1126/science.1137632},
journal = {Science (Washington, D.C.)},
number = 5813,
volume = 315,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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