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Title: Stickler takes the helm at MSHA

Abstract

New agency director of the USA's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Richard E. Stickler, inherits responsibility for implementing the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response (MINER) Act amidst one of the US coal industry's most unsafe periods. The article gives an outline of the new leader's career in the coal industry and presents his views on the importance and the implementation of the Act. Stickler's No.1 priority is to do everything he can to protect the health and safety of America's miners. He believes that the goal for everyone in the mining community should be to achieve zero injuries and zero fatalities, and put an end to occupational illness.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20862128
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coal Age; Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; US MSHA; MINING; USA; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; PERSONNEL; MINING LAWS; IMPLEMENTATION; VIOLATIONS; ENFORCEMENT; MINE RESCUE; TRAINING

Citation Formats

Fiscor, S. Stickler takes the helm at MSHA. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Fiscor, S. Stickler takes the helm at MSHA. United States.
Fiscor, S. Fri . "Stickler takes the helm at MSHA". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20862128,
title = {Stickler takes the helm at MSHA},
author = {Fiscor, S.},
abstractNote = {New agency director of the USA's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Richard E. Stickler, inherits responsibility for implementing the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response (MINER) Act amidst one of the US coal industry's most unsafe periods. The article gives an outline of the new leader's career in the coal industry and presents his views on the importance and the implementation of the Act. Stickler's No.1 priority is to do everything he can to protect the health and safety of America's miners. He believes that the goal for everyone in the mining community should be to achieve zero injuries and zero fatalities, and put an end to occupational illness.},
doi = {},
journal = {Coal Age},
number = 12,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • A search for mutations in the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1) was carried out in affected members of a family with early-onset cataracts, lattice degeneration of the retina, and retinal detachment. They had no symptoms suggestive of involvement of nonocular tissues, as is typically found in the Stickler syndrome. The COL2A1 gene was amplified with PCR, and the products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results suggested a mutation in one allele for exon 10. Sequencing of the fragment demonstrated a single-base mutation that converted the codon for glycine at position [alpha]1-67 to aspartate. The mutation wasmore » found in three affected members of the family available for study but not in unaffected members or 100 unrelated individuals. Comparison with previously reported mutations suggested that mutations introducing premature termination codons in the COL2A1 gene are a frequent cause of the Stickler syndrome, but mutations in the COL2A1 gene that replace glycine codons with codons for bulkier amino acid can produce a broad spectrum of disorders that range from lethal chondrodysplasias to a syndrome involving only ocular tissues, similar to the syndrome in the family originally described by Wagner in 1938. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.« less
  • Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at amino acid position [alpha]1-9 in exon 7 to a premature termination signal for translation. The second mutation found to cause AOmore » was, therefore, similar to the first in that both created premature termination signals in the COL2A1 gene. Since mutations producing premature termination signals have not previously been detected in genes for fibrillar collagens, the results raise the possibility that such mutations in the COL2A1 gene are a common cause of AO. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Hereditary arthro-ophtalmopathy (AO) or Stickler Syndrome (MIM No. 10830) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by vitro-retinal degeneration and other connective tissue disturbances. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene, coding for type II collagen chains, have been described in a few patients. The wide spectrum of clinical manifestations is presumably due to genetic heterogeneity, since only about 50% of the Stickler families so far studied show cosegregation of the disease with the COL2A1 locus. We have investigated a large pedigree (19 individuals of whom 9 are affected) in which severe myopia with vitro-retinal degeneration consegregated with joint laxity, recurrent inguinal hernias,more » and degenerative changes of the hip and the knee. The 3{prime} end COL2A1 VNTR polymorphism was utilized for linkage analysis. In order to get the maximum informativity, we have analyzed the allelic microheterogeneity of this VNTR, due to the repeat sequence variation, by means of a single strand polymorphism. Mendelian inheritance of the different single strands was observed as expected. Discordance of segregation between the disease and the COL2A1 locus was thus established inequivocally in this family.« less
  • The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximalmore » value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.« less
  • Hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, or {open_quotes}Stickler syndrome,{close_quotes} is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterized by a variety of ocular and skeletal anomalies which frequently lead to retinal detachment and precocious osteoarthritis. A variety of mutations in the COL2A1 gene have been identified in {open_quotes}Stickler{close_quotes} families; in most cases studied thus far, the consequence of mutation is the premature generation of a stop codon. We report here the characterization of a COL2A1 gene mutation in the original kindred described by Stickler et al. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was used to screen for mutations in the entire COL2A1 gene in an affected membermore » from the kindred. A prominent heteroduplex species was noted in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from a region of the gene including exons 17 to 20. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA resulted in the identification of a base substitution at the A{sup -2} position of the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of IVS17. Sequencing of DNA from affected and unaffected family members confirmed that the mutation segregated with the disease phenotype. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of poly A+ RNA demonstrated that the mutant allele utilized a cryptic splice site in exon 18 of the gene, eliminating 16 bp at the start of exon 18. This frameshift eventually results in a premature termination codon. These findings are the first report of a splice site mutation in classical Stickler syndrome and they provide a satisfying historical context in which to view COL2A1 mutations in this dysplasia. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less