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Title: Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Formulation of High-Order Difference-Frequency Mixing in Plasmas

Abstract

We investigate high-order difference-frequency mixing in plasmas, taking into account the microscopic rescattering physics and propagation effects for the first time. We show that phase matching can occur over a broad frequency range, up to very high photon energies, and that it is confined to specific temporal and spatial windows. This gated phase matching mechanism is driven by the continuous phase slip between two driving fields and can be employed for manipulating the temporal, spatial, and spectral properties of high harmonic emission.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20861641
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.043903; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; FREQUENCY MIXING; FREQUENCY RANGE; HARMONICS; PHOTONS; PLASMA; RESCATTERING

Citation Formats

Cohen, Oren, Popmintchev, Tenio, Gaudiosi, David M., Murnane, Margaret M., and Kapteyn, Henry C. Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Formulation of High-Order Difference-Frequency Mixing in Plasmas. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.043903.
Cohen, Oren, Popmintchev, Tenio, Gaudiosi, David M., Murnane, Margaret M., & Kapteyn, Henry C. Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Formulation of High-Order Difference-Frequency Mixing in Plasmas. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.043903.
Cohen, Oren, Popmintchev, Tenio, Gaudiosi, David M., Murnane, Margaret M., and Kapteyn, Henry C. Fri . "Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Formulation of High-Order Difference-Frequency Mixing in Plasmas". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.043903.
@article{osti_20861641,
title = {Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Formulation of High-Order Difference-Frequency Mixing in Plasmas},
author = {Cohen, Oren and Popmintchev, Tenio and Gaudiosi, David M. and Murnane, Margaret M. and Kapteyn, Henry C.},
abstractNote = {We investigate high-order difference-frequency mixing in plasmas, taking into account the microscopic rescattering physics and propagation effects for the first time. We show that phase matching can occur over a broad frequency range, up to very high photon energies, and that it is confined to specific temporal and spatial windows. This gated phase matching mechanism is driven by the continuous phase slip between two driving fields and can be employed for manipulating the temporal, spatial, and spectral properties of high harmonic emission.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.043903},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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