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Title: Quantum networking with photons and trapped atoms (Invited)

Abstract

Distributed quantum information processing requires a reliable quantum memory and a faithful carrier of quantum information. Atomic qubits have very long coherence times and are thus excellent candidates for quantum information storage, whereas photons are ideal for the transport of quantum information as they can travel long distances with a minimum of decoherence. We discuss the theoretical and experimental combination of these two systems and their use for not only quantum information transfer but also scalable quantum computation architectures.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. FOCUS Center and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20861625
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Optical Society of America. Part B, Optical Physics; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1364/JOSAB.24.000300; (c) 2007 Optical Society of America; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE; INFORMATION THEORY; PHOTON-ATOM COLLISIONS; PHOTONS; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM MECHANICS; QUBITS; TRAPPING

Citation Formats

Moehring, D. L., Madsen, M. J., Younge, K. C., Kohn, R. N. Jr., Maunz, P., Duan, L.-M., Monroe, C., Blinov, B. B., and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195. Quantum networking with photons and trapped atoms (Invited). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.24.000300.
Moehring, D. L., Madsen, M. J., Younge, K. C., Kohn, R. N. Jr., Maunz, P., Duan, L.-M., Monroe, C., Blinov, B. B., & Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195. Quantum networking with photons and trapped atoms (Invited). United States. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.24.000300.
Moehring, D. L., Madsen, M. J., Younge, K. C., Kohn, R. N. Jr., Maunz, P., Duan, L.-M., Monroe, C., Blinov, B. B., and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195. Thu . "Quantum networking with photons and trapped atoms (Invited)". United States. doi:10.1364/JOSAB.24.000300.
@article{osti_20861625,
title = {Quantum networking with photons and trapped atoms (Invited)},
author = {Moehring, D. L. and Madsen, M. J. and Younge, K. C. and Kohn, R. N. Jr. and Maunz, P. and Duan, L.-M. and Monroe, C. and Blinov, B. B. and Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195},
abstractNote = {Distributed quantum information processing requires a reliable quantum memory and a faithful carrier of quantum information. Atomic qubits have very long coherence times and are thus excellent candidates for quantum information storage, whereas photons are ideal for the transport of quantum information as they can travel long distances with a minimum of decoherence. We discuss the theoretical and experimental combination of these two systems and their use for not only quantum information transfer but also scalable quantum computation architectures.},
doi = {10.1364/JOSAB.24.000300},
journal = {Journal of the Optical Society of America. Part B, Optical Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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