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Title: How Much Entanglement Can Be Generated between Two Atoms by Detecting Photons?

Abstract

It is possible to achieve an arbitrary amount of entanglement between two atoms using only spontaneously emitted photons, linear optics, single-photon sources, and projective measurements. This is in contrast to all current experimental proposals for entangling two atoms, which are fundamentally restricted to one entanglement bit or 'ebit'.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20861573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.010502; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; BEAM OPTICS; PHOTON EMISSION; PHOTONS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT

Citation Formats

Lamata, L., Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching, Garcia-Ripoll, J. J., and Cirac, J. I. How Much Entanglement Can Be Generated between Two Atoms by Detecting Photons?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.010502.
Lamata, L., Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching, Garcia-Ripoll, J. J., & Cirac, J. I. How Much Entanglement Can Be Generated between Two Atoms by Detecting Photons?. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.010502.
Lamata, L., Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching, Garcia-Ripoll, J. J., and Cirac, J. I. Fri . "How Much Entanglement Can Be Generated between Two Atoms by Detecting Photons?". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.010502.
@article{osti_20861573,
title = {How Much Entanglement Can Be Generated between Two Atoms by Detecting Photons?},
author = {Lamata, L. and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching and Garcia-Ripoll, J. J. and Cirac, J. I.},
abstractNote = {It is possible to achieve an arbitrary amount of entanglement between two atoms using only spontaneously emitted photons, linear optics, single-photon sources, and projective measurements. This is in contrast to all current experimental proposals for entangling two atoms, which are fundamentally restricted to one entanglement bit or 'ebit'.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.98.010502},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 1,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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