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Title: Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

Abstract

We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)
  2. Physics Department, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia)
  3. Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20860513
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 97; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.025506; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; FRESNEL LENS; GOLD; ILLUMINANCE; RESOLUTION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Williams, G. J., Quiney, H. M., Dhal, B. B., Tran, C. Q., Nugent, K. A., Peele, A. G., Paterson, D., and Jonge, M. D. de. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.97.025506.
Williams, G. J., Quiney, H. M., Dhal, B. B., Tran, C. Q., Nugent, K. A., Peele, A. G., Paterson, D., & Jonge, M. D. de. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.97.025506.
Williams, G. J., Quiney, H. M., Dhal, B. B., Tran, C. Q., Nugent, K. A., Peele, A. G., Paterson, D., and Jonge, M. D. de. 2006. "Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.97.025506.
@article{osti_20860513,
title = {Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging},
author = {Williams, G. J. and Quiney, H. M. and Dhal, B. B. and Tran, C. Q. and Nugent, K. A. and Peele, A. G. and Paterson, D. and Jonge, M. D. de},
abstractNote = {We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVLETT.97.025506},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 7
}
  • This paper reports improved reconstruction of complex wave fields from extended objects. The combination of ptychography with Fresnel diffractive imaging results in better reconstructions with fewer iterations required to convergence than either method considered separately. The method is applied to retrieve the projected thickness of a gold microstructure and comparative results using ptychography and Fresnel diffractive imaging are presented.
  • A Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging experiment is performed using a pinhole as a test object. The experimental parameters of the beam curvature and coherence length of the illuminating radiation are varied to investigate their effects on the reconstruction process. It is found that a sufficient amount of curvature across the sample strongly ameliorates the effects of low coherence, even when the sample size exceeds the coherence length.
  • Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to “invert” the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. But, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the “far-field”—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the “near field” where Fresnel diffraction mustmore » be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large A n , the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. Finally we verify, by experiment, this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well.« less