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Title: Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma

Abstract

Micrometer-sized particles adhered to a surface can be released when exposed to plasma. In an experiment with a glass surface coated with lunar-simulant dust, it was found that particle release requires exposure to both plasma and an electron beam. The dust release rate diminishes almost exponentially in time, which is consistent with a random process. As proposed here, charges of particles adhered to the surface fluctuate. These charges experience a fluctuating electric force that occasionally overcomes the adhesive van der Waals force, causing particle release. The release rate increases with plasma density, so that plasma cleaning is feasible at high plasma densities. Applications of this cleaning include controlling particulate contamination in semiconductor manufacturing, dust mitigation in the exploration of the moon and Mars, and dusty plasmas.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20860466
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2401155; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; BEAM-PLASMA SYSTEMS; DUSTS; ELECTRON BEAMS; FLUCTUATIONS; MITIGATION; PLASMA; PLASMA DENSITY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SURFACE CLEANING; SURFACES; VAN DER WAALS FORCES; WALL EFFECTS

Citation Formats

Flanagan, T. M., and Goree, J. Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2401155.
Flanagan, T. M., & Goree, J. Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2401155.
Flanagan, T. M., and Goree, J. Fri . "Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2401155.
@article{osti_20860466,
title = {Dust release from surfaces exposed to plasma},
author = {Flanagan, T. M. and Goree, J.},
abstractNote = {Micrometer-sized particles adhered to a surface can be released when exposed to plasma. In an experiment with a glass surface coated with lunar-simulant dust, it was found that particle release requires exposure to both plasma and an electron beam. The dust release rate diminishes almost exponentially in time, which is consistent with a random process. As proposed here, charges of particles adhered to the surface fluctuate. These charges experience a fluctuating electric force that occasionally overcomes the adhesive van der Waals force, causing particle release. The release rate increases with plasma density, so that plasma cleaning is feasible at high plasma densities. Applications of this cleaning include controlling particulate contamination in semiconductor manufacturing, dust mitigation in the exploration of the moon and Mars, and dusty plasmas.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2401155},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 12,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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