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Title: Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets

Abstract

Reduction of proton acceleration in the interaction of a high-intensity, picosecond laser with a 50-{mu}m aluminum target was observed when 0.1-6 {mu}m of plastic was deposited on the back surface (opposite side of the laser). The maximum energy and number of energetic protons observed at the back of the target were greatly reduced in comparison to pure aluminum and plastic targets of the same thickness. This is attributed to the effect of the interface between the layers. Modeling of the electron propagation in the targets using a hybrid code showed strong magnetic-field generation at the interface and rapid surface heating of the aluminum layer, which may account for the results.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [2] more »;  [2] « less
  1. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW (United Kingdom) and Instituto Superior Tecnico, GoLP, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)
  2. (United Kingdom)
  3. (United States)
  4. (Greece)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20860453
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics of Plasmas; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2395928; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATION; ALUMINIUM; BEAM-PLASMA SYSTEMS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; LASER TARGETS; LASERS; LAYERS; LIGHT TRANSMISSION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; PLASMA; PLASMA GUNS; PLASMA HEATING; PLASMA SIMULATION; PLASTICS; PROTONS; RADIATION TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Wei, M. S., Davies, J. R., Clark, E. L., Beg, F. N., Gopal, A., Tatarakis, M., Willingale, L., Nilson, P., Dangor, A. E., Norreys, P. A., Zepf, M., Krushelnick, K., Plasma Physics Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston RG7 4PR, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Department of Electronics, 73133 Chania, Crete, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX, Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW. Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2395928.
Wei, M. S., Davies, J. R., Clark, E. L., Beg, F. N., Gopal, A., Tatarakis, M., Willingale, L., Nilson, P., Dangor, A. E., Norreys, P. A., Zepf, M., Krushelnick, K., Plasma Physics Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston RG7 4PR, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Department of Electronics, 73133 Chania, Crete, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX, Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, & Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW. Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2395928.
Wei, M. S., Davies, J. R., Clark, E. L., Beg, F. N., Gopal, A., Tatarakis, M., Willingale, L., Nilson, P., Dangor, A. E., Norreys, P. A., Zepf, M., Krushelnick, K., Plasma Physics Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston RG7 4PR, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Department of Electronics, 73133 Chania, Crete, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX, Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW. Fri . "Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2395928.
@article{osti_20860453,
title = {Reduction of proton acceleration in high-intensity laser interaction with solid two-layer targets},
author = {Wei, M. S. and Davies, J. R. and Clark, E. L. and Beg, F. N. and Gopal, A. and Tatarakis, M. and Willingale, L. and Nilson, P. and Dangor, A. E. and Norreys, P. A. and Zepf, M. and Krushelnick, K. and Plasma Physics Division, AWE plc, Aldermaston RG7 4PR and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW and Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Department of Electronics, 73133 Chania, Crete and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW and CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX and Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Queen University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN and Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road SW7 2BW},
abstractNote = {Reduction of proton acceleration in the interaction of a high-intensity, picosecond laser with a 50-{mu}m aluminum target was observed when 0.1-6 {mu}m of plastic was deposited on the back surface (opposite side of the laser). The maximum energy and number of energetic protons observed at the back of the target were greatly reduced in comparison to pure aluminum and plastic targets of the same thickness. This is attributed to the effect of the interface between the layers. Modeling of the electron propagation in the targets using a hybrid code showed strong magnetic-field generation at the interface and rapid surface heating of the aluminum layer, which may account for the results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2395928},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 12,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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