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Title: Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages

Abstract

Voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels are involved in the immune response. Kv1.3 is highly expressed in activated macrophages and T-effector memory cells of autoimmune disease patients. Macrophages are actively involved in T-cell activation by cytokine production and antigen presentation. However, unlike T-cells, macrophages express Kv1.5, which is resistant to Kv1.3-drugs. We demonstrate that mononuclear phagocytes express different Kv1.3/Kv1.5 ratios, leading to biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels. Therefore, Kv1.3-based treatments to alter physiological responses, such as proliferation and activation, are impaired by Kv1.5 expression. The presence of Kv1.5 in the macrophagic lineage should be taken into account when designing Kv1.3-based therapies.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [4]
  1. Molecular Physiology Laboratory, Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)
  2. Departament de Patologia i Terapeutica Experimental, Universitat de Barcelona-Campus de Bellvitge, E-08907 Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain)
  3. Institut de Recerca Biomedica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)
  4. Molecular Physiology Laboratory, Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain). E-mail: afelipe@ub.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857973
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 352; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.120; PII: S0006-291X(06)02604-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANTIGENS; CELL PROLIFERATION; DRUGS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; MACROPHAGES; PATIENTS; POTASSIUM IONS; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Villalonga, Nuria, Escalada, Artur, Vicente, Ruben, Sanchez-Tillo, Ester, Celada, Antonio, Solsona, Carles, and Felipe, Antonio. Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.120.
Villalonga, Nuria, Escalada, Artur, Vicente, Ruben, Sanchez-Tillo, Ester, Celada, Antonio, Solsona, Carles, & Felipe, Antonio. Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.120.
Villalonga, Nuria, Escalada, Artur, Vicente, Ruben, Sanchez-Tillo, Ester, Celada, Antonio, Solsona, Carles, and Felipe, Antonio. Fri . "Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.120.
@article{osti_20857973,
title = {Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages},
author = {Villalonga, Nuria and Escalada, Artur and Vicente, Ruben and Sanchez-Tillo, Ester and Celada, Antonio and Solsona, Carles and Felipe, Antonio},
abstractNote = {Voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels are involved in the immune response. Kv1.3 is highly expressed in activated macrophages and T-effector memory cells of autoimmune disease patients. Macrophages are actively involved in T-cell activation by cytokine production and antigen presentation. However, unlike T-cells, macrophages express Kv1.5, which is resistant to Kv1.3-drugs. We demonstrate that mononuclear phagocytes express different Kv1.3/Kv1.5 ratios, leading to biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels. Therefore, Kv1.3-based treatments to alter physiological responses, such as proliferation and activation, are impaired by Kv1.5 expression. The presence of Kv1.5 in the macrophagic lineage should be taken into account when designing Kv1.3-based therapies.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.120},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 352,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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