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Title: Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2

Abstract

In this study, we set out to investigate the role of Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 protein (FANCD2) in developmental stage-specific DNA damage responses in Caenorhabditis elegans. A mutant C. elegans strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding the FANCD2 homolog, FCD-2, exhibited egg-laying defects, precocious oogenesis, and partial defects in fertilization. The mutant strain also had a lower hatching rate than the wild-type after {gamma}-irradiation of embryos, but not after the irradiation of pachytene stage germ cells. This mutation sensitized pachytene stage germ cells to the genotoxic effects of photoactivated psoralen, as seen by a greatly reduced hatching rate and increased chromosomal aberrations. This mutation also enhanced physiological M-phase arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, our data reveal that the C. elegans FANCD2 homolog participates in the repair of spontaneous DNA damage and DNA crosslinks, not only in proliferating cells but also in pachytene stage cells, and it may have an additional role in double-stranded DNA break repair during embryogenesis.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-ku, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology Research Institute, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-ku, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of). E-mail: kooh@yonsei.ac.kr
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857957
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 352; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.039; PII: S0006-291X(06)02509-5; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; ANEMIAS; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; DNA; DNA DAMAGES; EMBRYOS; FERTILIZATION; GAMMA RADIATION; GENES; GERM CELLS; HATCHING; IRRADIATION; MUTANTS; OOGENESIS; PSORALEN

Citation Formats

Lee, Kyong Yun, Yang, Insil, Park, Jung-Eun, Baek, Ok-Ryun, Chung, Kee Yang, and Koo, Hyeon-Sook. Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.039.
Lee, Kyong Yun, Yang, Insil, Park, Jung-Eun, Baek, Ok-Ryun, Chung, Kee Yang, & Koo, Hyeon-Sook. Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.039.
Lee, Kyong Yun, Yang, Insil, Park, Jung-Eun, Baek, Ok-Ryun, Chung, Kee Yang, and Koo, Hyeon-Sook. Fri . "Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.039.
@article{osti_20857957,
title = {Developmental stage- and DNA damage-specific functions of C. elegans FANCD2},
author = {Lee, Kyong Yun and Yang, Insil and Park, Jung-Eun and Baek, Ok-Ryun and Chung, Kee Yang and Koo, Hyeon-Sook},
abstractNote = {In this study, we set out to investigate the role of Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 protein (FANCD2) in developmental stage-specific DNA damage responses in Caenorhabditis elegans. A mutant C. elegans strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding the FANCD2 homolog, FCD-2, exhibited egg-laying defects, precocious oogenesis, and partial defects in fertilization. The mutant strain also had a lower hatching rate than the wild-type after {gamma}-irradiation of embryos, but not after the irradiation of pachytene stage germ cells. This mutation sensitized pachytene stage germ cells to the genotoxic effects of photoactivated psoralen, as seen by a greatly reduced hatching rate and increased chromosomal aberrations. This mutation also enhanced physiological M-phase arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, our data reveal that the C. elegans FANCD2 homolog participates in the repair of spontaneous DNA damage and DNA crosslinks, not only in proliferating cells but also in pachytene stage cells, and it may have an additional role in double-stranded DNA break repair during embryogenesis.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.11.039},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 352,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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  • No abstract prepared.