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Title: Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells

Abstract

We reported previously that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from chorionic villi of the human placenta could differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes under proper induction conditions and that these cells should be useful for allogeneic regenerative medicine, including cartilage tissue engineering. However, similar to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), though these placental cells can be isolated easily, they are difficult to study in detail because of their limited life span in vitro. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the life span of human placenta-derived mesenchymal cells (hPDMCs) by modifying hTERT and Bmi-1, and investigated whether these modified hPDMCs retained their differentiation capability and multipotency. Our results indicated that the combination of hTERT and Bmi-1 was highly efficient in prolonging the life span of hPDMCs with differentiation capability to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells in vitro. Clonal cell lines with directional differentiation ability were established from the immortalized parental hPDMC/hTERT + Bmi-1. Interestingly, hPDMC/Bmi-1 showed extended proliferation after long-term growth arrest and telomerase was activated in the immortal hPDMC/Bmi-1 cells. However, the differentiation potential was lost in these cells. This study reports a method to extend the life span of hPDMCs with hTERT and Bmi-1 that should become amore » useful tool for the study of mesenchymal stem cells.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [2];  [6]
  1. Division of Cell Processing, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)
  2. Division of Molecular Therapy, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)
  3. Laboratory of Tumor Cell Biology, Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)
  4. Yamaguchi Hospital, Nishi-Funa, Funabashi, Chiba (Japan)
  5. Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)
  6. Division of Cell Processing, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan). E-mail: takahasi@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857936
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 351; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.125; PII: S0006-291X(06)02361-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CARTILAGE; CELL PROLIFERATION; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DRUGS; IN VITRO; LIFE SPAN; MEDICINE; PLACENTA; STEM CELLS

Citation Formats

Zhang Xiaohong, Soda, Yasushi, Takahashi, Kenji, Bai, Yuansong, Mitsuru, Ayako, Igura, Koichi, Satoh, Hitoshi, Yamaguchi, Satoru, Tani, Kenzaburo, Tojo, Arinobu, and Takahashi, Tsuneo A. Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.125.
Zhang Xiaohong, Soda, Yasushi, Takahashi, Kenji, Bai, Yuansong, Mitsuru, Ayako, Igura, Koichi, Satoh, Hitoshi, Yamaguchi, Satoru, Tani, Kenzaburo, Tojo, Arinobu, & Takahashi, Tsuneo A. Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.125.
Zhang Xiaohong, Soda, Yasushi, Takahashi, Kenji, Bai, Yuansong, Mitsuru, Ayako, Igura, Koichi, Satoh, Hitoshi, Yamaguchi, Satoru, Tani, Kenzaburo, Tojo, Arinobu, and Takahashi, Tsuneo A. Fri . "Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.125.
@article{osti_20857936,
title = {Successful immortalization of mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from human placenta and the differentiation abilities of immortalized cells},
author = {Zhang Xiaohong and Soda, Yasushi and Takahashi, Kenji and Bai, Yuansong and Mitsuru, Ayako and Igura, Koichi and Satoh, Hitoshi and Yamaguchi, Satoru and Tani, Kenzaburo and Tojo, Arinobu and Takahashi, Tsuneo A.},
abstractNote = {We reported previously that mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from chorionic villi of the human placenta could differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes under proper induction conditions and that these cells should be useful for allogeneic regenerative medicine, including cartilage tissue engineering. However, similar to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), though these placental cells can be isolated easily, they are difficult to study in detail because of their limited life span in vitro. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the life span of human placenta-derived mesenchymal cells (hPDMCs) by modifying hTERT and Bmi-1, and investigated whether these modified hPDMCs retained their differentiation capability and multipotency. Our results indicated that the combination of hTERT and Bmi-1 was highly efficient in prolonging the life span of hPDMCs with differentiation capability to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cells in vitro. Clonal cell lines with directional differentiation ability were established from the immortalized parental hPDMC/hTERT + Bmi-1. Interestingly, hPDMC/Bmi-1 showed extended proliferation after long-term growth arrest and telomerase was activated in the immortal hPDMC/Bmi-1 cells. However, the differentiation potential was lost in these cells. This study reports a method to extend the life span of hPDMCs with hTERT and Bmi-1 that should become a useful tool for the study of mesenchymal stem cells.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.125},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 351,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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