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Title: Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}

Abstract

The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPAR{alpha} or {gamma}. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPAR{alpha} to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPAR{alpha}.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [1];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [2];  [4];  [6]
  1. CNRS, UMR 8601, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Paris F-75006 (France)
  2. (France)
  3. INSERM, U551, Paris F-75013 (France)
  4. Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Biochimie Metabolique et Clinique (EA 3617), Paris F-75006 (France)
  5. INSERM, U747, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Toxicologie et Signalisation Moleculaire, Paris F-75006 (France)
  6. INSERM, U747, Laboratoire de Pharmacologie, Toxicologie et Signalisation Moleculaire, Paris F-75006 (France) and Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006 (France). E-mail: Martine.Aggerbeck@univ-paris5.fr
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857931
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 351; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.122; PII: S0006-291X(06)02363-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARTERIOSCLEROSIS; COPPER; ESTERS; GENE REGULATION; GENES; MACROPHAGES; PROMOTERS; RECEPTORS; TRANSCRIPTION; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Jedidi, Iness, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Couturier, Martine, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris F-75013, Therond, Patrice, Gardes-Albert, Monique, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Legrand, Alain, Barouki, Robert, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique, and Aggerbeck, Martine. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.122.
Jedidi, Iness, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Couturier, Martine, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris F-75013, Therond, Patrice, Gardes-Albert, Monique, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Legrand, Alain, Barouki, Robert, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique, & Aggerbeck, Martine. Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.122.
Jedidi, Iness, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Couturier, Martine, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris F-75013, Therond, Patrice, Gardes-Albert, Monique, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Legrand, Alain, Barouki, Robert, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006, Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique, and Aggerbeck, Martine. Fri . "Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.122.
@article{osti_20857931,
title = {Cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides increase macrophage CD36 gene expression via PPAR{alpha}},
author = {Jedidi, Iness and Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006 and Couturier, Martine and AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris F-75013 and Therond, Patrice and Gardes-Albert, Monique and Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006 and Legrand, Alain and Barouki, Robert and Universite Paris Descartes, Paris F-75006 and Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique and Aggerbeck, Martine},
abstractNote = {The uptake of oxidized LDL by macrophages is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The scavenger receptor CD36 is one major receptor that internalizes oxidized LDL. In differentiated human macrophages, we compared the regulation of CD36 expression by copper-oxidized LDL or their products. Only oxidized derivatives of cholesteryl ester (CEOOH) increased the amount of CD36 mRNA (2.5-fold). Both oxidized LDL and CEOOH treatment increased two to fourfold the transcription of promoters containing peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor responsive elements (PPRE) in the presence of PPAR{alpha} or {gamma}. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift-assays with nuclear extracts prepared from macrophages treated by either oxidized LDL or CEOOH showed increased binding of PPAR{alpha} to the CD36 gene promoter PPRE. In conclusion, CEOOH present in oxidized LDL increase CD36 gene expression in a pathway involving PPAR{alpha}.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.122},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 3,
volume = 351,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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