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Title: Magnetic characterization of Daphnia resting eggs

Abstract

This study characterized the magnetic materials found within Daphnia resting eggs by measuring static magnetization with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, after forming two types of conditions, each of which consists of zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC). Magnetic ions, such as Fe{sup 3+}, contained in Daphnia resting eggs existed as (1) paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles, demonstrated by a magnetization and temperature dependence of the magnetic moments under an applied magnetic field after ZFC and FC, and (2) ferromagnetic particles with definite magnetic moments, the content of which was estimated to be very low, demonstrated by the Moskowitz test. Conventionally, biomagnets have been directly detected by transmission electron microscopes (TEM). As demonstrated in this study, it is possible to nondestructively detect small biomagnets by magnetization measurement, especially after two types of ZFC and FC. This nondestructive method can be applied in detecting biomagnets in complex biological organisms.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [5]
  1. Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)
  2. Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan) and Environmental Biotechnology Laboratory, Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan). E-mail: tamami@rtri.or.jp
  3. Materials Characterization Central Laboratory, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)
  4. Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita Tama-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)
  5. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857922
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 351; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.078; PII: S0006-291X(06)02325-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DAPHNIA; EGGS; IRON IONS; MAGNETIC MATERIALS; MAGNETIC MOMENTS; MAGNETITE; MAGNETIZATION; MAGNETOMETERS; PARAMAGNETISM; SQUID DEVICES; SUPERPARAMAGNETISM; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Sakata, Masanobu, Kawasaki, Tamami, Shibue, Toshimichi, Takada, Atsushi, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Namiki, Hideo, and Department of Biology, Waseda University, 1-6-1 nishiwaseda, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050. Magnetic characterization of Daphnia resting eggs. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.078.
Sakata, Masanobu, Kawasaki, Tamami, Shibue, Toshimichi, Takada, Atsushi, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Namiki, Hideo, & Department of Biology, Waseda University, 1-6-1 nishiwaseda, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050. Magnetic characterization of Daphnia resting eggs. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.078.
Sakata, Masanobu, Kawasaki, Tamami, Shibue, Toshimichi, Takada, Atsushi, Yoshimura, Hideyuki, Namiki, Hideo, and Department of Biology, Waseda University, 1-6-1 nishiwaseda, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050. Fri . "Magnetic characterization of Daphnia resting eggs". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.078.
@article{osti_20857922,
title = {Magnetic characterization of Daphnia resting eggs},
author = {Sakata, Masanobu and Kawasaki, Tamami and Shibue, Toshimichi and Takada, Atsushi and Yoshimura, Hideyuki and Namiki, Hideo and Department of Biology, Waseda University, 1-6-1 nishiwaseda, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050},
abstractNote = {This study characterized the magnetic materials found within Daphnia resting eggs by measuring static magnetization with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, after forming two types of conditions, each of which consists of zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC). Magnetic ions, such as Fe{sup 3+}, contained in Daphnia resting eggs existed as (1) paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles, demonstrated by a magnetization and temperature dependence of the magnetic moments under an applied magnetic field after ZFC and FC, and (2) ferromagnetic particles with definite magnetic moments, the content of which was estimated to be very low, demonstrated by the Moskowitz test. Conventionally, biomagnets have been directly detected by transmission electron microscopes (TEM). As demonstrated in this study, it is possible to nondestructively detect small biomagnets by magnetization measurement, especially after two types of ZFC and FC. This nondestructive method can be applied in detecting biomagnets in complex biological organisms.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.078},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 2,
volume = 351,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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