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Title: Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

Abstract

We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Laboratoire de Physique des Solides (UMR CNRS 8502), bat 510, Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)
  2. Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, Universite Bordeaux I, avenue Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20853985
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 24; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.74.245416; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CARBON; CARBON FIBERS; NANOTUBES; ORIENTATION; PVA; REINFORCED PLASTICS; SOLVENTS; SYNTHESIS; TENSILE PROPERTIES; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; YOUNG MODULUS

Citation Formats

Pichot, V., Albouy, P. A., Launois, P., Badaire, S., Zakri, C., and Poulin, P.. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.74.245416.
Pichot, V., Albouy, P. A., Launois, P., Badaire, S., Zakri, C., & Poulin, P.. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.74.245416.
Pichot, V., Albouy, P. A., Launois, P., Badaire, S., Zakri, C., and Poulin, P.. Fri . "Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.74.245416.
@article{osti_20853985,
title = {Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers},
author = {Pichot, V. and Albouy, P. A. and Launois, P. and Badaire, S. and Zakri, C. and Poulin, P.},
abstractNote = {We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.74.245416},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 24,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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