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Title: An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation

Abstract

Sophisticated methods for real-time motion compensation include using the linear accelerator, MLC, or treatment couch. To design such a couch, the required couch and control system dynamics need to be investigated. We used an existing treatment couch known as the Hexapod{sup TM} to gain insight into couch dynamics and an internal model controller to simulate feedback control of respiration-induced motion. The couch dynamics, described using time constants and dead times, were investigated using step inputs. The resulting data were modeled as first and second order systems with dead time. The couch was determined to have a linear response for step inputs {<=}1 cm. Motion data from 12 patients were obtained using a skin marker placed on the abdomen of the patient and the marker data were assumed to be an exact surrogate of tumor motion. The feedback system was modeled with the couch as a second-ordersystem and the controller as a first order system. The time constants of the couch and controller and the dead times were varied starting with parameters obtained from the Hexapod{sup TM} couch and the performance of the feedback system was evaluated. The resulting residual motion under feedback control was generally <0.3 cm when a fastmore » enough couch was simulated.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20853836
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2372218; (c) 2006 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABDOMEN; COLLIMATORS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DEAD TIME; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PERFORMANCE; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; SKIN

Citation Formats

D'Souza, Warren D., McAvoy, Thomas J., and Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute of Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2372218.
D'Souza, Warren D., McAvoy, Thomas J., & Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute of Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.2372218.
D'Souza, Warren D., McAvoy, Thomas J., and Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute of Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. Fri . "An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.2372218.
@article{osti_20853836,
title = {An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation},
author = {D'Souza, Warren D. and McAvoy, Thomas J. and Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute of Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742},
abstractNote = {Sophisticated methods for real-time motion compensation include using the linear accelerator, MLC, or treatment couch. To design such a couch, the required couch and control system dynamics need to be investigated. We used an existing treatment couch known as the Hexapod{sup TM} to gain insight into couch dynamics and an internal model controller to simulate feedback control of respiration-induced motion. The couch dynamics, described using time constants and dead times, were investigated using step inputs. The resulting data were modeled as first and second order systems with dead time. The couch was determined to have a linear response for step inputs {<=}1 cm. Motion data from 12 patients were obtained using a skin marker placed on the abdomen of the patient and the marker data were assumed to be an exact surrogate of tumor motion. The feedback system was modeled with the couch as a second-ordersystem and the controller as a first order system. The time constants of the couch and controller and the dead times were varied starting with parameters obtained from the Hexapod{sup TM} couch and the performance of the feedback system was evaluated. The resulting residual motion under feedback control was generally <0.3 cm when a fast enough couch was simulated.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2372218},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}