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Title: A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis

Abstract

Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantom and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), allmore » normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging fibroglandular breasts. The ASF performance was best with the AR technique and nine projections.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Medical University of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio 43614 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20853402
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: DOI: 10.1118/1.2219090; (c) 2006 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALGORITHMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BIOPSY; FLEXIBILITY; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; ITERATIVE METHODS; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; PERFORMANCE; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; RECEPTORS; SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO

Citation Formats

Rakowski, Joseph T, and Dennis, Michael J. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1118/1.2219090.
Rakowski, Joseph T, & Dennis, Michael J. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis. United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.2219090
Rakowski, Joseph T, and Dennis, Michael J. Tue . "A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis". United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.2219090.
@article{osti_20853402,
title = {A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis},
author = {Rakowski, Joseph T and Dennis, Michael J},
abstractNote = {Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantom and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), all normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging fibroglandular breasts. The ASF performance was best with the AR technique and nine projections.},
doi = {10.1118/1.2219090},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/20853402}, journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 8,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {8}
}