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Title: Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

Abstract

Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)
  2. Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)
  3. Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20853263
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.73.235414; (c) 2006 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ARGON IONS; CHANNELING; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DIFFUSION; ION BEAMS; KEV RANGE; LAYERS; MOLECULAR DYNAMICS METHOD; MORPHOLOGY; PLATINUM; SCALE MODELS; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; THERMAL SPIKES

Citation Formats

Hansen, Henri, Redinger, Alex, Messlinger, Sebastian, Stoian, Georgiana, Michely, Thomas, Rosandi, Yudi, Urbassek, Herbert M., and Linke, Udo. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111). United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.73.235414.
Hansen, Henri, Redinger, Alex, Messlinger, Sebastian, Stoian, Georgiana, Michely, Thomas, Rosandi, Yudi, Urbassek, Herbert M., & Linke, Udo. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111). United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.73.235414.
Hansen, Henri, Redinger, Alex, Messlinger, Sebastian, Stoian, Georgiana, Michely, Thomas, Rosandi, Yudi, Urbassek, Herbert M., and Linke, Udo. 2006. "Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVB.73.235414.
@article{osti_20853263,
title = {Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)},
author = {Hansen, Henri and Redinger, Alex and Messlinger, Sebastian and Stoian, Georgiana and Michely, Thomas and Rosandi, Yudi and Urbassek, Herbert M. and Linke, Udo},
abstractNote = {Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVB.73.235414},
journal = {Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 23,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 6
}
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