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Title: Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus

Abstract

Narcissus mosaic virus is a Potexvirus, a member of the Flexiviridae family of filamentous plant viruses. Fiber diffraction patterns from oriented sols of narcissus mosaic virus have been used to determine the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have a radius of 55 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 34.45 {+-} 0.5 A, with 7.8 subunits per turn of the helix. We conclude that all members of the Potexvirus genus have close to 8 subunits per helical turn.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Box 1634, Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)
  2. BioCAT, CSRRI, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago IL 60616 (United States)
  3. Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Box 1634, Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States). E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850588
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 357; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2006.07.051; PII: S0042-6822(06)00522-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DIFFUSE SCATTERING; FIBERS; PLANT DISEASES; PLANTS; SOLS; SYMMETRY; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Kendall, Amy, Bian, Wen, Junn, Justin, McCullough, Ian, Gore, David, and Stubbs, Gerald. Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.07.051.
Kendall, Amy, Bian, Wen, Junn, Justin, McCullough, Ian, Gore, David, & Stubbs, Gerald. Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus. United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.07.051.
Kendall, Amy, Bian, Wen, Junn, Justin, McCullough, Ian, Gore, David, and Stubbs, Gerald. Sat . "Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus". United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.07.051.
@article{osti_20850588,
title = {Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus},
author = {Kendall, Amy and Bian, Wen and Junn, Justin and McCullough, Ian and Gore, David and Stubbs, Gerald},
abstractNote = {Narcissus mosaic virus is a Potexvirus, a member of the Flexiviridae family of filamentous plant viruses. Fiber diffraction patterns from oriented sols of narcissus mosaic virus have been used to determine the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have a radius of 55 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 34.45 {+-} 0.5 A, with 7.8 subunits per turn of the helix. We conclude that all members of the Potexvirus genus have close to 8 subunits per helical turn.},
doi = {10.1016/j.virol.2006.07.051},
journal = {Virology},
number = 2,
volume = 357,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Sat Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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