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Title: The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

Abstract

The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada)
  2. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5 (Canada). E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850585
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; Journal Volume: 357; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2006.08.010; PII: S0042-6822(06)00555-1; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DNA; HELA CELLS; INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; PROMOTERS; RNA; TRANSCRIPTION; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Greco-Stewart, Valerie S., Miron, Paul, Abrahem, Abrahem, and Pelchat, Martin. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.08.010.
Greco-Stewart, Valerie S., Miron, Paul, Abrahem, Abrahem, & Pelchat, Martin. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome. United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.08.010.
Greco-Stewart, Valerie S., Miron, Paul, Abrahem, Abrahem, and Pelchat, Martin. Fri . "The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome". United States. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2006.08.010.
@article{osti_20850585,
title = {The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome},
author = {Greco-Stewart, Valerie S. and Miron, Paul and Abrahem, Abrahem and Pelchat, Martin},
abstractNote = {The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.},
doi = {10.1016/j.virol.2006.08.010},
journal = {Virology},
number = 1,
volume = 357,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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