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Title: Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

Abstract

Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, whilemore » it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)
  2. Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore) and Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore). E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850506
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 217; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.09.012; PII: S0041-008X(06)00345-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; CALCIUM IONS; DEPOLARIZATION; DRUGS; FLUORESCENCE; INFLAMMATION; INJURIES; IODIDES; LEAD; LIVER CELLS; MEMBRANES; METABOLITES; MITOCHONDRIA; PERMEABILITY; PHOSPHORYLATION

Citation Formats

Lim, M.S., Lim, Priscilla L.K., Gupta, Rashi, and Boelsterli, Urs A.. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.09.012.
Lim, M.S., Lim, Priscilla L.K., Gupta, Rashi, & Boelsterli, Urs A.. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.09.012.
Lim, M.S., Lim, Priscilla L.K., Gupta, Rashi, and Boelsterli, Urs A.. Fri . "Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.09.012.
@article{osti_20850506,
title = {Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes},
author = {Lim, M.S. and Lim, Priscilla L.K. and Gupta, Rashi and Boelsterli, Urs A.},
abstractNote = {Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, while it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.09.012},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 217,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and themore » upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 {mu}M) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction.« less
  • We have previously shown that, in trout hepatocytes, exposure to a high dose of copper (Cu) leads to disruption of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis and elevated formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the latter ultimately causing cell death. In the present study, we aimed at identifying, using a lower Cu concentration, the role of mitochondria in this scenario, the potential involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), and the mode of cell death induced by the metal. Incubation with 10 {mu}M Cu resulted in a strong stimulation of ROS formation, and after 2 h of exposure a significant increase ofmore » both apoptotic and necrotic cells was seen. Co-incubation of Cu-treated hepatocytes with the iron-chelator deferoxamine significantly inhibited ROS production and completely prevented cell death. The origin of the radicals generated was at least partly mitochondrial, as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ROS production was diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, but since this also aggravated the elevation of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} induced by Cu, it did not preserve cell viability. In a sub-population of cells, Cu induced a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and occurrence of the MPT. Cyclosporin A, which did not inhibit ROS formation, prevented the onset of the MPT and inhibited apoptotic, but not necrotic, cell death. Cu-induced apoptosis therefore appears to be dependent on induction of the MPT, but the prominent contribution of mitochondria to ROS generation also suggests an important role of mitochondria in necrotic cell death.« less
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