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Title: Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with many human diseases, and glutathione (GSH)-dependent processes are pivotal in limiting tissue damage. To test the hypothesis that Gr1{sup a1Neu} (Neu) mice, which do not express glutathione reductase (GR), would be more susceptible than are wild-type mice to ROS-mediated injury, we studied the effects of diquat, a redox cycling toxicant. Neu mice exhibited modest, dose- and time-dependent elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, 126 {+-} 36 U/l at 2 h after 5 {mu}mol/kg of diquat, but no ALT elevations were observed in diquat-treated C3H/HeN mice for up to 6 h after 50 {mu}mol/kg of diquat. Histology indicated little or no hepatic necrosis in diquat-treated mice of either strain, but substantial renal injury was observed in diquat-treated Neu mice, characterized by brush border sloughing in the proximal tubules by 1 h and tubular necrosis by 2 h after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg. Decreases in renal GSH levels were observed in the Neu mice by 2 h post dose (3.4 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.2 {+-} 0.0 {mu}mol/g tissue at 0 and 50 {mu}mol/kg, respectively), and increases in renal GSSG levels were observed in the Neu mice as early as 0.5 h after 7.5more » {mu}mol/kg (105.5 {+-} 44.1 vs 27.9 {+-} 4.8 nmol/g tissue). Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated by 2 h in Neu mice after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (Neu vs C3H, 32.8 {+-} 4.1 vs 17.9 {+-} 0.3 mg/dl). Diquat-induced renal injury in the GR-deficient Neu mice offers a useful model for studies of ROS-induced renal necrosis and of the contributions of GR in defense against oxidant-mediated injuries in vivo.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [4]
  1. Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States) and Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States). E-mail: rogersl@ccri.net
  2. Center for Cell and Vascular Biology, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)
  3. Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)
  4. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850503
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; Journal Volume: 217; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2006.08.012; PII: S0041-008X(06)00292-4; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALANINES; BLOOD; CHICKENS; GLUTATHIONE; HISTOLOGY; IN VIVO; INJURIES; LIVER; MICE; NECROSIS; OXIDIZERS; TIME DEPENDENCE; TUBULES; UREA

Citation Formats

Rogers, Lynette K., Bates, Carlton M., Welty, Stephen E., Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH, Smith, Charles V., and Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional MediElsevier Inc.cal Center, Seattle, WA. Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.08.012.
Rogers, Lynette K., Bates, Carlton M., Welty, Stephen E., Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH, Smith, Charles V., & Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional MediElsevier Inc.cal Center, Seattle, WA. Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice. United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.08.012.
Rogers, Lynette K., Bates, Carlton M., Welty, Stephen E., Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH, Smith, Charles V., and Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional MediElsevier Inc.cal Center, Seattle, WA. Fri . "Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice". United States. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2006.08.012.
@article{osti_20850503,
title = {Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice},
author = {Rogers, Lynette K. and Bates, Carlton M. and Welty, Stephen E. and Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH and Smith, Charles V. and Center for Developmental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Seattle Children's Hospital and Regional MediElsevier Inc.cal Center, Seattle, WA},
abstractNote = {Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with many human diseases, and glutathione (GSH)-dependent processes are pivotal in limiting tissue damage. To test the hypothesis that Gr1{sup a1Neu} (Neu) mice, which do not express glutathione reductase (GR), would be more susceptible than are wild-type mice to ROS-mediated injury, we studied the effects of diquat, a redox cycling toxicant. Neu mice exhibited modest, dose- and time-dependent elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, 126 {+-} 36 U/l at 2 h after 5 {mu}mol/kg of diquat, but no ALT elevations were observed in diquat-treated C3H/HeN mice for up to 6 h after 50 {mu}mol/kg of diquat. Histology indicated little or no hepatic necrosis in diquat-treated mice of either strain, but substantial renal injury was observed in diquat-treated Neu mice, characterized by brush border sloughing in the proximal tubules by 1 h and tubular necrosis by 2 h after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg. Decreases in renal GSH levels were observed in the Neu mice by 2 h post dose (3.4 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.2 {+-} 0.0 {mu}mol/g tissue at 0 and 50 {mu}mol/kg, respectively), and increases in renal GSSG levels were observed in the Neu mice as early as 0.5 h after 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (105.5 {+-} 44.1 vs 27.9 {+-} 4.8 nmol/g tissue). Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated by 2 h in Neu mice after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (Neu vs C3H, 32.8 {+-} 4.1 vs 17.9 {+-} 0.3 mg/dl). Diquat-induced renal injury in the GR-deficient Neu mice offers a useful model for studies of ROS-induced renal necrosis and of the contributions of GR in defense against oxidant-mediated injuries in vivo.},
doi = {10.1016/j.taap.2006.08.012},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology},
number = 3,
volume = 217,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The kidney is a primary target for numerous toxic compounds. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) are responsible for the metabolic activation of various chemical compounds, and in the kidney are predominantly expressed in proximal tubules. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal proximal tubular P450s are critical for nephrotoxicity caused by chemicals such as chloroform. We developed two new mouse models, one having proximal tubule-specific deletion of the cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) gene (the enzyme required for all microsomal P450 activities), designated proximal tubule-Cpr-null (PTCN), and the other having proximal tubule-specific rescue of CPR activity withmore » the global suppression of CPR activity in all extra-proximal tubular tissues, designated extra-proximal tubule-Cpr-low (XPT-CL). The PTCN, XPT-CL, Cpr-low (CL), and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with a single oral dose of chloroform at 200 mg/kg. Blood, liver and kidney samples were obtained at 24 h after the treatment. Renal toxicity was assessed by measuring BUN and creatinine levels, and by pathological examination. The blood and tissue levels of chloroform were determined. The severity of toxicity was less in PTCN and CL mice, compared with that of WT and XPT-CL mice. There were no significant differences in chloroform levels in the blood, liver, or kidney, between PTCN and WT mice, or between XPT-CL and CL mice. These findings indicate that local P450-dependent activities play an important role in the nephrotoxicity induced by chloroform. Our results also demonstrate the usefulness of these novel mouse models for studies of chemical-induced kidney toxicity. - Highlights: • New mouse models were developed with varying P450 activities in the proximal tubule. • These mouse models were treated with chloroform, a nephrotoxicant. • Studies showed the importance of local P450s in chloroform-induced nephrotoxicity.« less
  • Cadmium (Cd) is a nephrotoxic industrial and environmental pollutant that causes a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule. Kim-1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is normally not detectable in non-injured kidney, but is up-regulated and shed into the urine during the early stages of Cd-induced proximal tubule injury. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between the Cd-induced increase in Kim-1 expression and the onset of necrotic and apoptotic cell death in the proximal tubule. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 0.6 mg (5.36 {mu}mol) Cd/kg, subcutaneously, 5 days per week for up to 12more » weeks. Urine samples were analyzed for levels of Kim-1 and the enzymatic markers of cell death, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alpha-glutathione-S-transferase ({alpha}-GST). In addition, necrotic cells were specifically labeled by perfusing the kidneys in situ with ethidium homodimer using a procedure that has been recently developed and validated in the Prozialeck laboratory. Cryosections of the kidneys were also processed for the immunofluorescent visualization of Kim-1 and the identification of apoptotic cells by TUNEL labeling. Results showed that significant levels of Kim-1 began to appear in the urine after 6 weeks of Cd treatment, whereas the levels of total protein, {alpha}-GST and LDH were not increased until 8-12 weeks. Results of immunofluorescence labeling studies showed that after 6 weeks and 12 weeks, Kim-1 was expressed in the epithelial cells of the proximal tubule, but that there was no increase in the number of necrotic cells, and only a modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells at 12 weeks. These results indicate that the Cd-induced increase in Kim-1 expression occurs before the onset of necrosis and at a point where there is only a modest level of apoptosis in the proximal tubule.« less
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