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Title: Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To report the 5-year tumor control and toxicity outcomes for patients with localized prostate treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2002, 367 patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning which incorporated inverse planning optimization was used. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Results: The median V100 and D90 were 96% and 173 Gy, respectively. In 96% of cases a D90 of >140 Gy was achieved. The median urethral and rectal doses were 100% and 33% of the prescription doses, respectively. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival outcomes for favorable and intermediate risk patients according to the ASTRO definition were 96% and 89%, respectively. In these patients no dosimetric parameter was identified which influenced the biochemical outcome. Of 38% who developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, 63% had resolution of their symptoms within a median time of 6 months. The incidence of late rectal and urinary Grade 3 or higher toxicities were 1% and 4%, respectively. Seven percent (n = 27) developed late rectal bleeding (Grade 2) and 19% experienced late Grade 2more » urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning consistently achieved optimal coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose with concomitant low doses delivered to the urethra and rectum. Biochemical control outcomes were excellent at 5 years and late toxicity was unusual. These data demonstrate that real-time planning methods can consistently and reliably deliver the intended dose distribution to achieve an optimal therapeutic ratio between the target and normal tissue structures.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  3. Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850295
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.030; PII: S0360-3016(06)02796-9; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIGENS; BRACHYTHERAPY; CARCINOMAS; HEALTH HAZARDS; IODINE 125; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; RECTUM; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SYMPTOMS; TOXICITY; URINARY TRACT

Citation Formats

Zelefsky, Michael J., Yamada, Yoshiya, Cohen, Gil'ad N., Shippy, Alison, Chan, Heather, Fridman, David, and Zaider, Marco. Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.030.
Zelefsky, Michael J., Yamada, Yoshiya, Cohen, Gil'ad N., Shippy, Alison, Chan, Heather, Fridman, David, & Zaider, Marco. Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.030.
Zelefsky, Michael J., Yamada, Yoshiya, Cohen, Gil'ad N., Shippy, Alison, Chan, Heather, Fridman, David, and Zaider, Marco. Mon . "Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.030.
@article{osti_20850295,
title = {Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer},
author = {Zelefsky, Michael J. and Yamada, Yoshiya and Cohen, Gil'ad N. and Shippy, Alison and Chan, Heather and Fridman, David and Zaider, Marco},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To report the 5-year tumor control and toxicity outcomes for patients with localized prostate treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2002, 367 patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning which incorporated inverse planning optimization was used. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Results: The median V100 and D90 were 96% and 173 Gy, respectively. In 96% of cases a D90 of >140 Gy was achieved. The median urethral and rectal doses were 100% and 33% of the prescription doses, respectively. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival outcomes for favorable and intermediate risk patients according to the ASTRO definition were 96% and 89%, respectively. In these patients no dosimetric parameter was identified which influenced the biochemical outcome. Of 38% who developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, 63% had resolution of their symptoms within a median time of 6 months. The incidence of late rectal and urinary Grade 3 or higher toxicities were 1% and 4%, respectively. Seven percent (n = 27) developed late rectal bleeding (Grade 2) and 19% experienced late Grade 2 urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning consistently achieved optimal coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose with concomitant low doses delivered to the urethra and rectum. Biochemical control outcomes were excellent at 5 years and late toxicity was unusual. These data demonstrate that real-time planning methods can consistently and reliably deliver the intended dose distribution to achieve an optimal therapeutic ratio between the target and normal tissue structures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.030},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survivalmore » parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and {>=}8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.« less
  • Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289more » patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities. In particular, our MFS and CSS rates for high-risk patients appear superior to those of published radical prostatectomy series.« less
  • Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I{sup 125} brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I{sup 125} monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS weremore » evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I{sup 125} monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.« less
  • The authors assessed the relationship between transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the probability of survival without distant metastases (survival) in patients with clinically localized prostatic cancer. Fifty-eight patients with obstructive voiding symptoms who underwent TURP within 12 months before pelvic lymphadenectomy and /sup 125/I-implantation were compared with 131 patients who did not require TURP before implantation. None received other treatment for the tumor. The overall survivals for the two groups were not significantly different, P greater than 0.1. When stratified by tumor grade or the presence or absence of pelvic lymph node metastases, the survivals for the twomore » groups were also similar, P . greater than 0.1. However, survival associated with Stage C tumors was greater in the No TURP than in the TURP group (P . 0.003), and survival associated with Stage C tumors was greater in the TURP than in the No TURP group (P . 0.005). These data fail to provide convincing evidence that transurethral resection of prostatic cancers has an unfavorable impact on disease progression.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the time course response of prostate metabolism to irradiation using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3-month intervals and its impact on biochemical control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and April 2010, 24 patients with localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in the Evaluation of the Response to Irradiation with MR Spectroscopy (ERIS) trial. All the patients had been treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy with or without long-term adjuvant hormonal therapy (LTHT) and underwent 3-T MRS and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays at baseline and every 3 months thereafter up to 12 months. Results: After radiation, the meanmore » normalized citrate level (citrate/water) decreased significantly over time, both in the peripheral zone (PZ) (p = 0.0034) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.0008), whereas no significant change was observed in mean normalized choline levels (choline/water) in the PZ (p = 0.84) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.95). At 6 months after radiation, the mean choline level was significantly lower in the PZ for patients with a PSA value of {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 12 months (4.9 {+-} 1.7 vs. 7.1 {+-} 1.5, p = 0.0378). Similar results were observed at 12 months in the PZ (6.2 {+-} 2.3 vs. 11.4 {+-} 4.1, p = 0.0117 for choline level and 3.4 {+-} 0.7 vs. 16.1 {+-} 6.1, p = 0.0054 for citrate level) and also in the entire prostate (6.2 {+-} 1.9 vs. 10.4 {+-} 3.2, p = 0.014 for choline level and 3.0 {+-} 0.8 vs. 13.3 {+-} 4.7, p = 0.0054 for citrate level). For patients receiving LTHT, there was no correlation between choline or citrate levels and PSA value, either at baseline or at follow-up. Conclusions: Low normalized choline in the PZ, 6 months after radiation, predicts which patients attained a PSA {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 1 year. Further analyses with longer follow-up times are warranted to determine whether or not these new biomarkers can conclusively predict the early radiation response and the clinical outcome for patients with or without LTHT.« less