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Title: Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive {sup 125}I implantation of the prostate for organ-confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined, adenocarcinoma of the prostate with clinical Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, no nodal or metastatic disease, prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/mL, and Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive {sup 125}I permanent seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 27 institutions accrued a total of 101 patients to this protocol, with no institution accruing >8 patients. Six patients were ineligible, leaving 95 properly entered as eligible in the study. The median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 0.4-6.5 years). At 5 years, 5 patients had local failure, 1 had evidence of distant failure, and 6 (6%) had biochemical failure. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 96.7%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Eight patients had a maximal acute toxicity level of 3, and nomore » patient had Grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity. During follow-up, 2 patients had maximal Grade 3 toxicity, both related to bladder issues, and no patient experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this clinical protocol (a multi-institutional trial of brachytherapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate) have demonstrated that this type of trial can be successfully completed through Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Biochemical disease-free survival was comparable with other brachytherapy published series and with the results after surgery and external beam radiotherapy.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). E-mail: clawton@radonc.mcw.edu
  2. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)
  4. Department of Urology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA (United States)
  5. Department of Pathology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
  7. Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  8. Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)
  9. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20850292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 67; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.016; PII: S0360-3016(06)02763-5; Copyright (c) 2007 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIGENS; BEAMS; BLADDER; BRACHYTHERAPY; CARCINOMAS; FAILURES; IODINE 125; METASTASES; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Lawton, Colleen A., DeSilvio, Michelle, Lee, W. Robert, Gomella, Leonard, Grignon, David, Gillin, Michael, Morton, Gerard, Pisansky, Thomas, and Sandler, Howard. Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.016.
Lawton, Colleen A., DeSilvio, Michelle, Lee, W. Robert, Gomella, Leonard, Grignon, David, Gillin, Michael, Morton, Gerard, Pisansky, Thomas, & Sandler, Howard. Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05). United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.016.
Lawton, Colleen A., DeSilvio, Michelle, Lee, W. Robert, Gomella, Leonard, Grignon, David, Gillin, Michael, Morton, Gerard, Pisansky, Thomas, and Sandler, Howard. Mon . "Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.016.
@article{osti_20850292,
title = {Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05)},
author = {Lawton, Colleen A. and DeSilvio, Michelle and Lee, W. Robert and Gomella, Leonard and Grignon, David and Gillin, Michael and Morton, Gerard and Pisansky, Thomas and Sandler, Howard},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive {sup 125}I implantation of the prostate for organ-confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined, adenocarcinoma of the prostate with clinical Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, no nodal or metastatic disease, prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/mL, and Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive {sup 125}I permanent seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 27 institutions accrued a total of 101 patients to this protocol, with no institution accruing >8 patients. Six patients were ineligible, leaving 95 properly entered as eligible in the study. The median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 0.4-6.5 years). At 5 years, 5 patients had local failure, 1 had evidence of distant failure, and 6 (6%) had biochemical failure. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 96.7%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Eight patients had a maximal acute toxicity level of 3, and no patient had Grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity. During follow-up, 2 patients had maximal Grade 3 toxicity, both related to bladder issues, and no patient experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this clinical protocol (a multi-institutional trial of brachytherapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate) have demonstrated that this type of trial can be successfully completed through Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Biochemical disease-free survival was comparable with other brachytherapy published series and with the results after surgery and external beam radiotherapy.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.08.016},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 67,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I{sup 125} implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I{sup 125} seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to themore » prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the probable generalizability of the outcomes.« less
  • Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer latemore » radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to normal structures or to unimodal radiotherapy techniques.« less
  • Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT.more » AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for the feasibility of clinical trial accrual and tolerability using CT for PCa.« less
  • Purpose: Toxicity, pathologic complete response, and long-term outcomes are reported for the neoadjuvant therapies assessed in a randomized phase 2 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and American College of Radiology Imaging Network trial for operable esophageal adenocarcinoma, staged as II-IVa by endoscopy/ultrasonography (EUS). Methods and Materials: A total of 86 eligible patients began treatment. For arm A, preoperative chemotherapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, on day 1, 8, 22, 29 during 45 Gy radiation therapy (RT), 1.8 Gy per day over 5 weeks. Adjuvant therapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and irinotecan, 65 mg/m{sup 2} daymore » 1, 8 every 21 days for 3 cycles. Arm B therapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 with RT, followed by adjuvant cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, and paclitaxel, 175 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1 every 21 days for 3 cycles. Stratification included EUS stage and performance status. Results: In arm A, median overall survival was 35 months, and 5-, 6-, and 7-year survival rates were 46%, 39%, and 35%, respectively, whereas for arm B, they were 21 months and 27%, 27%, and 23%, respectively. Median progression- or recurrence-free survival (PFS) was 39.8 months with a 3-year PFS of 50% for arm A and 12.4 months (P=.046) with 3-year PFS of 28% for arm B. Eighty percent of the observed incidents of progression occurred within 19 months. Survival did not differ significantly by EUS and performance status strata. Conclusions: Long-term survival was similar for both arms and did not appear superior to results achieved with other standard regimens.« less
  • Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56more » intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.« less