skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Soft x Rays from a Free-electron Laser Resolve a Single, Micron-sized Structure

Abstract

If photons are to map an object's structure, their wavelength must be no bigger than the object's finest features. But the shorter the wavelength, the greater the destructive energy each photon packs. Structural biologists get away with using x rays to map proteins and other biomolecules, but only because countless identical copies of a molecule, when arrayed in a crystal, share the radiation dose.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20849481
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics Today; Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2709544; (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CRYSTALS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; MOLECULES; PHOTONS; PROTEINS; RADIATION DOSES; SOFT X RADIATION; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Day, Charles. Soft x Rays from a Free-electron Laser Resolve a Single, Micron-sized Structure. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2709544.
Day, Charles. Soft x Rays from a Free-electron Laser Resolve a Single, Micron-sized Structure. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2709544.
Day, Charles. Mon . "Soft x Rays from a Free-electron Laser Resolve a Single, Micron-sized Structure". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2709544.
@article{osti_20849481,
title = {Soft x Rays from a Free-electron Laser Resolve a Single, Micron-sized Structure},
author = {Day, Charles},
abstractNote = {If photons are to map an object's structure, their wavelength must be no bigger than the object's finest features. But the shorter the wavelength, the greater the destructive energy each photon packs. Structural biologists get away with using x rays to map proteins and other biomolecules, but only because countless identical copies of a molecule, when arrayed in a crystal, share the radiation dose.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2709544},
journal = {Physics Today},
number = 1,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}