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Title: DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program

Abstract

Efforts are underway to provide more cost-effective options for coal-fired power plants to meet stringent emissions limits. Several recently completed DOE/NETL R & D projects were successful in achieving the short-term goal of controlling NOx emissions at 0.15 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies. In anticipation of CAIR and possible congressional multi-pollutant legislation, DOE/NETL issued a solicitation in 2004 to continue R & D efforts to meet the 2007 goal and to initiate R & D targeting the 2010 goal of achieving 0.10 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies in lieu of SCR. As a result, four new NOx R & D projects are currently underway and will be completed over the next three years. The article outlines: ALSTOM's Project on developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx burner for tangentially-fired boilers; Babcock and Wilcox's demonstration of an advanced NOx control technology to achieve an emission rate of 0.10 lb/MMBtu while burning bituminous coal for both wall- and cyclone-fired boilers; Reaction Engineering International's (REI) full-scale field testing of advanced layered technology application (ALTA) NOx control for cyclone fired boilers; and pilot-scale testing of ALTA NOx control of coal-fired boilers also by REI. DOE/NETL has begun an R & D effort to optimize performance of SCRmore » controls to achieve the long term goal of 0.01 lb/MMBtu NOx emission rate by 2020. 1 fig.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. US Department of Energy (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20838339
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Power Engineering (Barrington); Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; USA; NITROGEN OXIDES; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; STAGED COMBUSTION; US DOE; SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION; COMMERCIALIZATION; BURNERS; CYCLONE COMBUSTORS; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; FIELD TESTS

Citation Formats

Lani, B.W., Feeley, T.J. III, Miller, C.E., Carney, B.A., and Murphy, J.T.. DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Lani, B.W., Feeley, T.J. III, Miller, C.E., Carney, B.A., & Murphy, J.T.. DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program. United States.
Lani, B.W., Feeley, T.J. III, Miller, C.E., Carney, B.A., and Murphy, J.T.. 2006. "DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20838339,
title = {DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program},
author = {Lani, B.W. and Feeley, T.J. III and Miller, C.E. and Carney, B.A. and Murphy, J.T.},
abstractNote = {Efforts are underway to provide more cost-effective options for coal-fired power plants to meet stringent emissions limits. Several recently completed DOE/NETL R & D projects were successful in achieving the short-term goal of controlling NOx emissions at 0.15 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies. In anticipation of CAIR and possible congressional multi-pollutant legislation, DOE/NETL issued a solicitation in 2004 to continue R & D efforts to meet the 2007 goal and to initiate R & D targeting the 2010 goal of achieving 0.10 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies in lieu of SCR. As a result, four new NOx R & D projects are currently underway and will be completed over the next three years. The article outlines: ALSTOM's Project on developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx burner for tangentially-fired boilers; Babcock and Wilcox's demonstration of an advanced NOx control technology to achieve an emission rate of 0.10 lb/MMBtu while burning bituminous coal for both wall- and cyclone-fired boilers; Reaction Engineering International's (REI) full-scale field testing of advanced layered technology application (ALTA) NOx control for cyclone fired boilers; and pilot-scale testing of ALTA NOx control of coal-fired boilers also by REI. DOE/NETL has begun an R & D effort to optimize performance of SCR controls to achieve the long term goal of 0.01 lb/MMBtu NOx emission rate by 2020. 1 fig.},
doi = {},
journal = {Power Engineering (Barrington)},
number = 11,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month =
}
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