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Title: Monitoring the progress of emission inventories

Abstract

This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Exponent Inc., Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20838307
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: EM; Other Information: JLevy@Exponent.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GREENHOUSE GASES; INVENTORIES; GLOBAL ASPECTS; USA; MERCURY; EMISSION; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; AIR QUALITY; DATA COMPILATION; US EPA; MEASURING METHODS; COMBUSTION; POWER GENERATION; MINING; POLLUTION SOURCES; METAL INDUSTRY; RECOMMENDATIONS; KYOTO PROTOCOL; CARBON DIOXIDE; NITROUS OXIDE

Citation Formats

Levy, J.A. Jr., Solomon, D., Husk, M., Irving, B., Kruger, D., and Levin. L. Monitoring the progress of emission inventories. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Levy, J.A. Jr., Solomon, D., Husk, M., Irving, B., Kruger, D., & Levin. L. Monitoring the progress of emission inventories. United States.
Levy, J.A. Jr., Solomon, D., Husk, M., Irving, B., Kruger, D., and Levin. L. Fri . "Monitoring the progress of emission inventories". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20838307,
title = {Monitoring the progress of emission inventories},
author = {Levy, J.A. Jr. and Solomon, D. and Husk, M. and Irving, B. and Kruger, D. and Levin. L.},
abstractNote = {This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.},
doi = {},
journal = {EM},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • The 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000 and 2006) field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. Houston is known for having serious problems with non-attainment of air quality standards. We present a method that uses three models and aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories using an inverse modeling technique. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional variational (3D-VAR and 4D-VAR) inverse modeling techniquesmore » based on a least-squares method to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of CO, NOy (sum of all reactive nitrogen compounds), and SO2 emissions predicted by the 4-km-resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. We found that in 2006 the prior daytime emissions in the urban area of Houston have to be reduced by 40% {+-} 12% for CO and 7% {+-} 13% for NOy. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be reduced by 41% {+-} 15% for CO and 51% {+-} 9% for NOy. Major ports around Houston have their NOy emissions reduced as well, probably due to uncertainties in near-shore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the interannual emission variability between 2000 and 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have been reduced by 8% {+-} 20%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% {+-} 12% from 2000 to 2006. In the Houston Ship Channel, the daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% {+-} 17%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions sources.« less
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