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Title: Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln

Abstract

In this paper, based on analysis of the chemical and physical processes of clinker formation, a heat flux function was introduced to take account of the thermal effect of clinker formation. Combining the models of gas-solid flow, heat and mass transfer, and pulverized coal combustion, a set of mathematical models for a full-scale cement rotary kiln were established. In terms of commercial CFD code (FLUENT), the distributions of gas velocity, gas temperature, and gas components in a cement rotary kiln were obtained by numerical simulation of a 3000 t/d rotary kiln with a four-channel burner. The predicted results indicated that the improved model accounts for the thermal enthalpy of the clinker formation process and can give more insight (such as fluid flow, temperature, etc,) from within the cement rotary kiln, which is a benefit to better understanding of combustion behavior and an improvement of burner and rotary kiln technology. 25 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20838252
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Fuels; Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: jdlu@mail.hust.edu.cn
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; COAL; PULVERIZED FUELS; KILNS; COMBUSTION; CEMENT INDUSTRY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; BURNERS

Citation Formats

Shijie Wang, Jidong Lu, Weijie Li, Jie Li, and Zhijuan Hu. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/ef060027p.
Shijie Wang, Jidong Lu, Weijie Li, Jie Li, & Zhijuan Hu. Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln. United States. doi:10.1021/ef060027p.
Shijie Wang, Jidong Lu, Weijie Li, Jie Li, and Zhijuan Hu. Fri . "Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln". United States. doi:10.1021/ef060027p.
@article{osti_20838252,
title = {Modeling of pulverized coal combustion in cement rotary kiln},
author = {Shijie Wang and Jidong Lu and Weijie Li and Jie Li and Zhijuan Hu},
abstractNote = {In this paper, based on analysis of the chemical and physical processes of clinker formation, a heat flux function was introduced to take account of the thermal effect of clinker formation. Combining the models of gas-solid flow, heat and mass transfer, and pulverized coal combustion, a set of mathematical models for a full-scale cement rotary kiln were established. In terms of commercial CFD code (FLUENT), the distributions of gas velocity, gas temperature, and gas components in a cement rotary kiln were obtained by numerical simulation of a 3000 t/d rotary kiln with a four-channel burner. The predicted results indicated that the improved model accounts for the thermal enthalpy of the clinker formation process and can give more insight (such as fluid flow, temperature, etc,) from within the cement rotary kiln, which is a benefit to better understanding of combustion behavior and an improvement of burner and rotary kiln technology. 25 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.},
doi = {10.1021/ef060027p},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 6,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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