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Title: Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301

Abstract

Three new methods applicable to the determination of hazardous metal concentrations in stationary source emissions were developed and evaluated for use in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance applications. Two of the three independent methods, a continuous emissions monitor-based method (Xact) and an X-ray-based filter method (XFM), are used to measure metal emissions. The third method involves a quantitative aerosol generator (QAG), which produces a reference aerosol used to evaluate the measurement methods. A modification of EPA Method 301 was used to validate the three methods for As, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg, representing three hazardous waste combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) metal categories (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The measurement methods were evaluated at a hazardous waste combustor (HWC) by comparing measured with reference aerosol concentrations. The QAG, Xact, and XFM met the modified Method 301 validation criteria. All three of the methods demonstrated precisions and accuracies on the order of 5%. The measurement methods should be applicable to emissions from a wide range of sources, and the reference aerosol generator should be applicable to additional analytes. EPA recently approved an alternative monitoring petition for an HWC at Eli Lilly's Tippecanoe site in Lafayette, IN, in which themore » Xact is used for demonstrating compliance with the HWC MACT metal emissions (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The QAG reference aerosol generator was approved as a method for providing a quantitative reference aerosol, which is required for certification and continuing quality assurance of the Xact. 30 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Cooper Environmental Services, LLC, Portland, OR (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20838183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: jacooper@cooperenvironmental.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; METALS; MEASURING METHODS; US EPA; USA; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; VALIDATION; ACCURACY; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; COMBUSTORS; ARSENIC; CADMIUM; CHROMIUM; LEAD; MERCURY; AEROSOLS; FILTERS; EMISSION

Citation Formats

Catherine A. Yanca, Douglas C. Barth, Krag A. Petterson, Michael P. Nakanishi, John A. Cooper, Bruce E. Johnsen, Richard H. Lambert, and Daniel G. Bivins. Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464578.
Catherine A. Yanca, Douglas C. Barth, Krag A. Petterson, Michael P. Nakanishi, John A. Cooper, Bruce E. Johnsen, Richard H. Lambert, & Daniel G. Bivins. Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301. United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464578.
Catherine A. Yanca, Douglas C. Barth, Krag A. Petterson, Michael P. Nakanishi, John A. Cooper, Bruce E. Johnsen, Richard H. Lambert, and Daniel G. Bivins. Fri . "Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301". United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464578.
@article{osti_20838183,
title = {Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301},
author = {Catherine A. Yanca and Douglas C. Barth and Krag A. Petterson and Michael P. Nakanishi and John A. Cooper and Bruce E. Johnsen and Richard H. Lambert and Daniel G. Bivins},
abstractNote = {Three new methods applicable to the determination of hazardous metal concentrations in stationary source emissions were developed and evaluated for use in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance applications. Two of the three independent methods, a continuous emissions monitor-based method (Xact) and an X-ray-based filter method (XFM), are used to measure metal emissions. The third method involves a quantitative aerosol generator (QAG), which produces a reference aerosol used to evaluate the measurement methods. A modification of EPA Method 301 was used to validate the three methods for As, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg, representing three hazardous waste combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) metal categories (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The measurement methods were evaluated at a hazardous waste combustor (HWC) by comparing measured with reference aerosol concentrations. The QAG, Xact, and XFM met the modified Method 301 validation criteria. All three of the methods demonstrated precisions and accuracies on the order of 5%. The measurement methods should be applicable to emissions from a wide range of sources, and the reference aerosol generator should be applicable to additional analytes. EPA recently approved an alternative monitoring petition for an HWC at Eli Lilly's Tippecanoe site in Lafayette, IN, in which the Xact is used for demonstrating compliance with the HWC MACT metal emissions (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The QAG reference aerosol generator was approved as a method for providing a quantitative reference aerosol, which is required for certification and continuing quality assurance of the Xact. 30 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.},
doi = {10.1080/10473289.2006.10464578},
journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association},
number = 12,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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