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Title: Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources

Abstract

A laboratory-scale reactor was developed to evaluate the capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a gas into a liquid as an approach to control greenhouse gases emitted from fixed sources. CO{sub 2} at 5-50% concentrations was passed through a gas-exchange membrane and transferred into liquid media - tap water or simulated brine. When using water, capture efficiencies exceeded 50% and could be enhanced by adding base (e.g., sodium hydroxide) or the combination of base and carbonic anhydrase, a catalyst that speeds the conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonic acid. The transferred CO{sub 2} formed ions, such as bicarbonate or carbonate, depending on the amount of base present. Adding precipitating cations, like Ca{sup ++}, produced insoluble carbonate salts. Simulated brine proved nearly as efficient as water in absorbing CO{sub 2}, with less than a 6% reduction in CO{sub 2} transferred. The CO{sub 2} either dissolved into the brine or formed a mixture of gas and ions. If the chemistry was favorable, carbonate precipitate spontaneously formed. Energy expenditure of pumping brine up and down from subterranean depths was modeled. We concluded that using brine in a gas-exchange membrane system for capturing CO{sub 2} from a gas stream to liquid is technicallymore » feasible and can be accomplished at a reasonable expenditure of energy. 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs., 1 app.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20838178
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: dan.dziedzic@gm.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CAPTURE; POWER GENERATION; MEMBRANES; BRINES; SODIUM HYDROXIDES; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; CARBONATES; PRECIPITATION; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS

Citation Formats

Daniel Dziedzic, Kenneth B. Gross, Robert A. Gorski, and John T. Johnson. Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464568.
Daniel Dziedzic, Kenneth B. Gross, Robert A. Gorski, & John T. Johnson. Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources. United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464568.
Daniel Dziedzic, Kenneth B. Gross, Robert A. Gorski, and John T. Johnson. Fri . "Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources". United States. doi:10.1080/10473289.2006.10464568.
@article{osti_20838178,
title = {Feasibility study of using brine for carbon dioxide capture and storage from fixed sources},
author = {Daniel Dziedzic and Kenneth B. Gross and Robert A. Gorski and John T. Johnson},
abstractNote = {A laboratory-scale reactor was developed to evaluate the capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a gas into a liquid as an approach to control greenhouse gases emitted from fixed sources. CO{sub 2} at 5-50% concentrations was passed through a gas-exchange membrane and transferred into liquid media - tap water or simulated brine. When using water, capture efficiencies exceeded 50% and could be enhanced by adding base (e.g., sodium hydroxide) or the combination of base and carbonic anhydrase, a catalyst that speeds the conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonic acid. The transferred CO{sub 2} formed ions, such as bicarbonate or carbonate, depending on the amount of base present. Adding precipitating cations, like Ca{sup ++}, produced insoluble carbonate salts. Simulated brine proved nearly as efficient as water in absorbing CO{sub 2}, with less than a 6% reduction in CO{sub 2} transferred. The CO{sub 2} either dissolved into the brine or formed a mixture of gas and ions. If the chemistry was favorable, carbonate precipitate spontaneously formed. Energy expenditure of pumping brine up and down from subterranean depths was modeled. We concluded that using brine in a gas-exchange membrane system for capturing CO{sub 2} from a gas stream to liquid is technically feasible and can be accomplished at a reasonable expenditure of energy. 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs., 1 app.},
doi = {10.1080/10473289.2006.10464568},
journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association},
number = 12,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}