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Title: Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel

Abstract

Phase transformation diffusion bonding between a titanium alloy (TA17) and an austenitic stainless steel (0Cr18Ni9Ti) has been carried out in vacuum. Relationships between the bonding parameters and the tensile strength of the joints were investigated, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained: maximum cyclic temperature = 890 deg. C, minimum cyclic temperature = 800 deg. C, number of cycles = 10, bonding pressure = 5 MPa and heating rate = 30 deg. C/s. The maximum tensile strength of the joint was 307 MPa. The reaction products and the interface structure of the joints were investigated by light optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The study indicated the existence of {sigma} phase, Fe{sub 2}Ti, Fe-Ti intermetallic and {beta}-Ti in the reaction zone. The presence of the brittle Fe-Ti intermetallic phase lowered both the strength and the ductility of the phase transformation diffusion-bonded joint significantly.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 (China). E-mail: jjj-jenny@163.com
  2. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 (China)
  3. National Key Laboratory for Nuclear Fuel and Materials, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610041 (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20833183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Characterization; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.matchar.2005.09.015; PII: S1044-5803(05)00213-5; Copyright (c) 2005 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AUSTENITIC STEELS; DIFFUSION; DUCTILITY; HEATING RATE; INTERFACES; INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; STAINLESS STEELS; TITANIUM ALLOYS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Qin, B., Sheng, G.M., Huang, J.W., Zhou, B., Qiu, S.Y., and Li, C.. Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2005.09.015.
Qin, B., Sheng, G.M., Huang, J.W., Zhou, B., Qiu, S.Y., & Li, C.. Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel. United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2005.09.015.
Qin, B., Sheng, G.M., Huang, J.W., Zhou, B., Qiu, S.Y., and Li, C.. Sun . "Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel". United States. doi:10.1016/j.matchar.2005.09.015.
@article{osti_20833183,
title = {Phase transformation diffusion bonding of titanium alloy with stainless steel},
author = {Qin, B. and Sheng, G.M. and Huang, J.W. and Zhou, B. and Qiu, S.Y. and Li, C.},
abstractNote = {Phase transformation diffusion bonding between a titanium alloy (TA17) and an austenitic stainless steel (0Cr18Ni9Ti) has been carried out in vacuum. Relationships between the bonding parameters and the tensile strength of the joints were investigated, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained: maximum cyclic temperature = 890 deg. C, minimum cyclic temperature = 800 deg. C, number of cycles = 10, bonding pressure = 5 MPa and heating rate = 30 deg. C/s. The maximum tensile strength of the joint was 307 MPa. The reaction products and the interface structure of the joints were investigated by light optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The study indicated the existence of {sigma} phase, Fe{sub 2}Ti, Fe-Ti intermetallic and {beta}-Ti in the reaction zone. The presence of the brittle Fe-Ti intermetallic phase lowered both the strength and the ductility of the phase transformation diffusion-bonded joint significantly.},
doi = {10.1016/j.matchar.2005.09.015},
journal = {Materials Characterization},
number = 1,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Impulse pressuring diffusion bonding between a titanium alloy TA17 and an austenitic stainless steel 0Cr18Ni9Ti has been carried out in vacuum. Relationships between the bonding parameters and the tensile strength of the joints were investigated, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained: bonding temperature T = 825 deg. C, maximum impulse pressure P{sub max} = 50 MPa, minimum impulse pressure P{sub min} = 8 MPa, number of impulses N = 30, impulse frequency f = 0.5 Hz. The maximum tensile strength of the joint was 321 MPa and the effective bonding time was only 180 s. The reaction products andmore » the interface structure of the joints were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The study revealed the existence of FeTi, Fe{sub 2}Ti, {sigma} phase and {beta}-Ti in the reaction zone. Brittle Fe-Ti intermetallic phases lower the strength and ductility of the impulse pressuring diffusion bonded couples significantly. This technique provides a reliable and efficient bonding method of titanium alloy and stainless steel.« less
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