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Title: Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry

Abstract

The presence of concentrated shrinkage voids in thermal energy storage systems employing encapsulated phase change material can cause serious problems when one attempts to melt the solidified phase change material for the next thermal cycle. Experiments were performed and void-formation phenomena with rectangular flat plate, spherical, and torus shape capsules were investigated. The initial void growth, distribution and the total void in the capsule were photographically studied from transparent capsules using cyclohexane, hexadecane, butanediol and octadecane as phase change materials. The observations on freezing process and the shrinkage void distribution are presented. (author)

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)
  2. INEEL, Idaho Falls, ID 83404-5558 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20829600
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS; VOIDS; THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE EQUIPMENT; ENCAPSULATION; PLATES; SPHERES; TORI; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; CYCLOHEXANE; HEXADECANE; ALKANES; BUTANEDIOLS

Citation Formats

Revankar, Shripad T., and Croy, Travis. Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EXPTHERMFLUSCI.2006.03.026.
Revankar, Shripad T., & Croy, Travis. Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EXPTHERMFLUSCI.2006.03.026.
Revankar, Shripad T., and Croy, Travis. Mon . "Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EXPTHERMFLUSCI.2006.03.026.
@article{osti_20829600,
title = {Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry},
author = {Revankar, Shripad T. and Croy, Travis},
abstractNote = {The presence of concentrated shrinkage voids in thermal energy storage systems employing encapsulated phase change material can cause serious problems when one attempts to melt the solidified phase change material for the next thermal cycle. Experiments were performed and void-formation phenomena with rectangular flat plate, spherical, and torus shape capsules were investigated. The initial void growth, distribution and the total void in the capsule were photographically studied from transparent capsules using cyclohexane, hexadecane, butanediol and octadecane as phase change materials. The observations on freezing process and the shrinkage void distribution are presented. (author)},
doi = {10.1016/J.EXPTHERMFLUSCI.2006.03.026},
journal = {Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science},
number = 3,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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