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Title: Petrography of feed coals in the Soma power plant, Manisa, Turkey

Abstract

The coal-bearing Soma basin is one of the most productive lacustrine coal basins of western Anatolia-Turkey. This study mainly focuses on petrography of the feed coals (FCs) in the Soma power plant. A total of 16 feed coal samples were systematically collected once a week over an eight-week period from both group boiler units, B1-4 with 660 MW and B5-6 with 330 MW capacity. The most abundant maceral group of FCs is huminite, in which texto-ulminite, eu-ulminite, attrinite, densinite are rich. Liptinite group macerals in FCs include mainly sporinite, resinite, and liptodetrinite, which are considerably higher than the other identified liptinite macerals. In the inertinite group, fusinite and inertodetrinite are more abundant. Identifiable minerals with petrographical studies are pyrite, siderite, other minerals (e. g., carbonates, clay minerals, quartz, feldspar, etc.), and fossil shells. This study shows that FCs used are subbituminous in rank with mean random ulminite reflectance of 0.43% Rr oil from B1-4 units and 0.39% Rr oil from B5-6 units. This indicates that coal rank is slightly higher in the central mines (southern Soma) than in the Denis mines (northern Soma).

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Hacettepe University, Beytepe (Turkey). Dept. of Geological Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20813319
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery Utilisation and Environmental Effects; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 16
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; PETROGRAPHY; SUBBITUMINOUS COAL; MACERALS; TURKEY; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; REFLECTIVITY; VITRINITE

Citation Formats

Bulut, Y., and Karayigit, A.I. Petrography of feed coals in the Soma power plant, Manisa, Turkey. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/009083190910578.
Bulut, Y., & Karayigit, A.I. Petrography of feed coals in the Soma power plant, Manisa, Turkey. United States. doi:10.1080/009083190910578.
Bulut, Y., and Karayigit, A.I. Fri . "Petrography of feed coals in the Soma power plant, Manisa, Turkey". United States. doi:10.1080/009083190910578.
@article{osti_20813319,
title = {Petrography of feed coals in the Soma power plant, Manisa, Turkey},
author = {Bulut, Y. and Karayigit, A.I.},
abstractNote = {The coal-bearing Soma basin is one of the most productive lacustrine coal basins of western Anatolia-Turkey. This study mainly focuses on petrography of the feed coals (FCs) in the Soma power plant. A total of 16 feed coal samples were systematically collected once a week over an eight-week period from both group boiler units, B1-4 with 660 MW and B5-6 with 330 MW capacity. The most abundant maceral group of FCs is huminite, in which texto-ulminite, eu-ulminite, attrinite, densinite are rich. Liptinite group macerals in FCs include mainly sporinite, resinite, and liptodetrinite, which are considerably higher than the other identified liptinite macerals. In the inertinite group, fusinite and inertodetrinite are more abundant. Identifiable minerals with petrographical studies are pyrite, siderite, other minerals (e. g., carbonates, clay minerals, quartz, feldspar, etc.), and fossil shells. This study shows that FCs used are subbituminous in rank with mean random ulminite reflectance of 0.43% Rr oil from B1-4 units and 0.39% Rr oil from B5-6 units. This indicates that coal rank is slightly higher in the central mines (southern Soma) than in the Denis mines (northern Soma).},
doi = {10.1080/009083190910578},
journal = {Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery Utilisation and Environmental Effects},
number = 16,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • A mineable lignite bed (k1) in the Soma Formation from the southern part of the Soma basin is of middle Miocene age and was deposited in a lacustrine environment. Its thickness reaches up to 24 m, and it is extensively mined by open-pit methods. The Soma Formation was invaded by an olivine basaltic intrusion during the Pliocene-Pleistocene. The intrusion has resulted in a local contact metamorphic influence at the top level of the k1. The coal bed, on the basis of proximate analyses and random reflectance measurement (%Ro, random) of huminite/vitrinite of coals or groundmass of cokes, can be dividedmore » into normal coal, transition zone, and natural coke, differing in their degree of coal metamorphism. Closer to the contact point with the intrusion, moisture and volatile matter contents rapidly decrease, while calorific value and the %Ro, random values increase.« less
  • The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants that were burning local subbituminous or bituminous coals with sulfur contents in the range of 0.30-3.5 wt % have been examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite (Cr3+/illite) and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide (CrOOH) phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largelymore » as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur (0.50 wt %) bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents (2.60-3.56 wt %), chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely (>95%), Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+} (>95%), but in some cases, it is slightly less (>80%) and varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantly (>95%) Cr3+. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium (Cr0), similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy for speciation determination.« less
  • The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coalmore » from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.« less
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