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Title: Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health

Abstract

Although there has been substantial progress in improving ambient air quality in the United States, atmospheric concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) continue to exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards in many locations. Consequently, a large portion of the U.S. population continues to be exposed to unhealthful levels of ozone and fine particles. This issue of EM, entitled 'Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health' presents a series of articles that focus on the relationships between air quality and human health - what we know so far and the challenges that remain. Their titles are: Understanding the effects of air pollution on human health; Assessing population exposures in studies of human health effects of PM2.5; Establishing a national environmental public health tracking network; Linking air quality and exposure models; and On alert: air quality forecasting and health advisory warnings.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20813243
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: EM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; AIR POLLUTION; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; HEALTH HAZARDS; PUBLIC HEALTH; PARTICULATES; FOSSIL FUELS; COMBUSTION; AIR QUALITY; FORECASTING; SIMULATION; OZONE; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; WEATHER; USA

Citation Formats

S.T. Rao. Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
S.T. Rao. Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health. United States.
S.T. Rao. 2006. "Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20813243,
title = {Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health},
author = {S.T. Rao},
abstractNote = {Although there has been substantial progress in improving ambient air quality in the United States, atmospheric concentrations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) continue to exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards in many locations. Consequently, a large portion of the U.S. population continues to be exposed to unhealthful levels of ozone and fine particles. This issue of EM, entitled 'Understanding the relationships between air quality and human health' presents a series of articles that focus on the relationships between air quality and human health - what we know so far and the challenges that remain. Their titles are: Understanding the effects of air pollution on human health; Assessing population exposures in studies of human health effects of PM2.5; Establishing a national environmental public health tracking network; Linking air quality and exposure models; and On alert: air quality forecasting and health advisory warnings.},
doi = {},
journal = {EM},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 9
}
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