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Title: Environmental stability of PAH source indices in pyrogenic tars

Abstract

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental contaminants found in soil, sediments, and airborne particulates. The majority of PAHs found in modern soils and sediments arise from myriad anthropogenic petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. Tars and tar products such as creosote produced from the industrial pyrolysis of coal or oil at former manufactured gas plants (MGPs) or in coking retorts are viscous, oily substances that contain significant concentrations of PAH, usually in excess of 30% w/w. Pyrogenic tars and tar products have unique PAH patterns (source signatures) that are a function of their industrial production. Among pyrogenic materials, certain diagnostic ratios of environmentally recalcitrant 4-, 5- and 6-ring PAHs have been identified as useful environmental markers for tracking the signature of tars and petroleum in the environment. The use of selected PAH source ratios is based on the concept that PAHs with similar properties (i.e., molecular weight, partial pressure, solubility, partition coefficients, and biotic/abiotic degradation) will weather at similar rates in the environment thereby yielding stable ratios. The stability of more than 30 high molecular weight PAH ratios is evaluated during controlled studies of tar evaporation and aerobic biodegradation. The starting materials in these experiments consisted of relatively unweathered tars derivedmore » from coal and petroleum, respectively. The PAH ratios from these laboratory studies are compared to those measured in PAH residues found in tar-contaminated soils at a former MGP that operated with a carburetted water gas process.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. New Fields Environmental Forensics Practice, Rockland, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20813168
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: auhler@newfields.com
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; COAL TAR; TAR; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLLUTION SOURCES; STABILITY; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; SOILS; COAL GASIFICATION PLANTS; CONTAMINATION; TOWN GAS

Citation Formats

Uhler, A.D., and Emsbo-Mattingly, S.D. Environmental stability of PAH source indices in pyrogenic tars. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/s00128-006-0975-1.
Uhler, A.D., & Emsbo-Mattingly, S.D. Environmental stability of PAH source indices in pyrogenic tars. United States. doi:10.1007/s00128-006-0975-1.
Uhler, A.D., and Emsbo-Mattingly, S.D. Sat . "Environmental stability of PAH source indices in pyrogenic tars". United States. doi:10.1007/s00128-006-0975-1.
@article{osti_20813168,
title = {Environmental stability of PAH source indices in pyrogenic tars},
author = {Uhler, A.D. and Emsbo-Mattingly, S.D.},
abstractNote = {Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental contaminants found in soil, sediments, and airborne particulates. The majority of PAHs found in modern soils and sediments arise from myriad anthropogenic petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. Tars and tar products such as creosote produced from the industrial pyrolysis of coal or oil at former manufactured gas plants (MGPs) or in coking retorts are viscous, oily substances that contain significant concentrations of PAH, usually in excess of 30% w/w. Pyrogenic tars and tar products have unique PAH patterns (source signatures) that are a function of their industrial production. Among pyrogenic materials, certain diagnostic ratios of environmentally recalcitrant 4-, 5- and 6-ring PAHs have been identified as useful environmental markers for tracking the signature of tars and petroleum in the environment. The use of selected PAH source ratios is based on the concept that PAHs with similar properties (i.e., molecular weight, partial pressure, solubility, partition coefficients, and biotic/abiotic degradation) will weather at similar rates in the environment thereby yielding stable ratios. The stability of more than 30 high molecular weight PAH ratios is evaluated during controlled studies of tar evaporation and aerobic biodegradation. The starting materials in these experiments consisted of relatively unweathered tars derived from coal and petroleum, respectively. The PAH ratios from these laboratory studies are compared to those measured in PAH residues found in tar-contaminated soils at a former MGP that operated with a carburetted water gas process.},
doi = {10.1007/s00128-006-0975-1},
journal = {Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology},
number = 4,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}