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Title: High-Resolution Room Temperature Spectroscopy with Lanthanum Halides

Abstract

The most desirable features in a spectroscopic material are high sensitivity and high resolution. Cerium-activated crystals of lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce) have higher sensitivity and better spectroscopic resolution than sodium/cesium iodide (NaI/CsI) crystals because of higher density (5.29 g/cm{sup 3}), faster decay time (35 ns), minimal afterglow, and larger (63 000 photons/MeV) and more linear light output (6% nonlinearity over the energy range between 60 and 1332 keV). Of all the recent scintillator materials manufactured to date, LaBr{sub 3}, with cerium activators, is one of the most promising for high-resolution, fast timing techniques as applied to medical image reconstructions or associated particle imaging.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Bechtel Nevada (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20808487
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Science and Engineering; Journal Volume: 151; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2006 American Nuclear Society (ANS), United States, All rights reserved. http://epubs.ans.org/; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AFTERGLOW; CERIUM; CESIUM IODIDES; CRYSTALS; LANTHANUM; LANTHANUM BROMIDES; RESOLUTION; SODIUM; SODIUM IODIDES; SPECTROSCOPY; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K

Citation Formats

Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy. High-Resolution Room Temperature Spectroscopy with Lanthanum Halides. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy. High-Resolution Room Temperature Spectroscopy with Lanthanum Halides. United States.
Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy. Tue . "High-Resolution Room Temperature Spectroscopy with Lanthanum Halides". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20808487,
title = {High-Resolution Room Temperature Spectroscopy with Lanthanum Halides},
author = {Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy},
abstractNote = {The most desirable features in a spectroscopic material are high sensitivity and high resolution. Cerium-activated crystals of lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce) have higher sensitivity and better spectroscopic resolution than sodium/cesium iodide (NaI/CsI) crystals because of higher density (5.29 g/cm{sup 3}), faster decay time (35 ns), minimal afterglow, and larger (63 000 photons/MeV) and more linear light output (6% nonlinearity over the energy range between 60 and 1332 keV). Of all the recent scintillator materials manufactured to date, LaBr{sub 3}, with cerium activators, is one of the most promising for high-resolution, fast timing techniques as applied to medical image reconstructions or associated particle imaging.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nuclear Science and Engineering},
number = 3,
volume = 151,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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