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Title: Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays

Abstract

In the last decade a great deal of interest has arisen in using sparse arrays of cosmic ray detectors located at schools as a means of doing both outreach and physics research. This approach has the unique advantage of involving grade school students in an actual ongoing experiment, rather then a simple teaching exercise, while at the same time providing researchers with the basic infrastructure for installation of cosmic ray detectors. A survey is made of projects in North America and Europe and in particular the ALTA experiment at the University of Alberta which was the first experiment operating under this paradigm.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Centre for Subatomic Research, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N5 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20800090
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 828; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 35. internationals symposium on multiparticle dynamics; Workshop on particle correlations and femtoscopy, Kromeriz (Czech Republic), 9-17 Aug 2005; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2197427; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ALBERTA; COSMIC RADIATION; COSMIC RAY DETECTION; EDUCATION; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; RADIATION DETECTORS; TELESCOPE COUNTERS

Citation Formats

Soluk, R. A. Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2197427.
Soluk, R. A. Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2197427.
Soluk, R. A. Tue . "Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2197427.
@article{osti_20800090,
title = {Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays},
author = {Soluk, R. A.},
abstractNote = {In the last decade a great deal of interest has arisen in using sparse arrays of cosmic ray detectors located at schools as a means of doing both outreach and physics research. This approach has the unique advantage of involving grade school students in an actual ongoing experiment, rather then a simple teaching exercise, while at the same time providing researchers with the basic infrastructure for installation of cosmic ray detectors. A survey is made of projects in North America and Europe and in particular the ALTA experiment at the University of Alberta which was the first experiment operating under this paradigm.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2197427},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 828,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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